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I'm New to c# and I've been playing around with it and got stuck at returning something useful from a method. Any help will be great.

I Have this right now:

in Form1.cs:

Animal NewAnimal = new Animal("Jack", "Ramp");

In Animal.cs:

public Animal(string Fname, string Lname)
        {
            if (Fname == "Jack" | Lname == "Ramp")
            {
                string FullName;
                FullName = Fname + " " + Lname;
                //return FullName; <--- This is what i tried but didn't work--->
            }
        }
        //return FullName; <--- And Also tried this it didn't work --->

Maybe from the ones I tried I'm doing something wrong? How would I return the FullName to Form1.cs and display it in a label?

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5  
You can't return a value in the constructor. Make a property for fullname and get that from your class. –  Harrison Sep 21 '13 at 1:54
    
So why are you using a single bar for the If statement? You know the difference between conditional or and bitwise or, right? –  gunr2171 Sep 21 '13 at 2:01
    
@gunr2171 I believe the | operator evaluate both sides of the statement instead of short circuiting with the || operator. This should work. –  Harrison Sep 21 '13 at 2:04
1  
@Harrison, I'm really sure you are thinking of the wrong thing. Who cares if this "short circuts"? Either A or B or both need to match, so it will find the first one that works and not do the rest. This is faster anyways. And I'm really sure that a bitwise is flat out wrong here. –  gunr2171 Sep 21 '13 at 2:08
    
@gunr2171: according to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/kxszd0kx.aspx it's not wrong and can be used as bitwise or logical OR. "For bool operands, | computes the logical OR of its operands; that is, the result is false if and only if both its operands are false". Although I agree that the || operator is better/faster in this and most circumstances –  Harrison Sep 21 '13 at 2:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your shoes, I would review the basics of specifying a type in C#.

A type is a user-defined (that's you being the user) collection of fields, properties, methods, and a few other constructs that define data and behavior.

If your particular case, you need to consider the behaviors you're implementing.

  • Feeding a string to a new Animal
  • Getting that string from an Animal

Consider the following code:

public class Animal { 
  public string FullName { get; }

  public Animal(string firstName, string lastName) { 
    this.FullName = firstName + " " + lastName; 
  }
}

You can then retrieve the name of an Animal you instantiate.

var animal = new Animal("Bob", "Smith"); 
// ... later
if (animal.FullName.Equals("Jack Ramp", StringComparison.CurrentCulture)); 
textBox.Text = animal.FullName; 

If this gets you a little lost, I'd recommend reviewing (and actually working through the contained examples) in the Microsoft Types Overview. There is quite a bit of information in this article, but it's all important information on C#'s type system.

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Thanks for the Link and i'll work through it. –  Alexander Nazarkin Sep 21 '13 at 3:18

You want something like this:

public class Animal
{
    public Animal(string fName, string lName)
    {
        this.FName = fName;
        this.LName = lName;
    }
    public string FName {get;set;}
    public string LName {get;set;}
    public string FullName
    {
        get
        { 
            return String.Format("{0} {1}", FName,LName);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You are trying to return a value from the constructor ...

Define a method instead.

public string FullName(string Fname, string Lname)
{
if (Fname == "Jack" || Lname == "Ramp")
   {

                return Fname + " " + Lname;

    }

return "";

}
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The method that you have is called a Constructor. It is called when you want to create a new instance of an object. Although it has no return type in the definition, it "returns" a new instance of your object (though you can't really control that).

What you are expecting is to have another public method or property that will return a value.

public class Animal
{
    public string Fullname {get; set;}

    public Animal(string Fname, string Lname)
    {
        if (Fname == "Jack" || Lname == "Ramp")
        {
            FullName = Fname + " " + Lname;
        }
}

Then use the following:

Animal NewAnimal = new Animal("Jack", "Ramp");
var firstName = NewAnimal.FullName;
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Yaur's answer will work but to get closer to what you seem to be asking for I would do it (note: this is a modification of Yaur's code)

public class Animal
{
    public Animal(string fName, string lName)
    {
        this.FName = fName;
        this.LName = lName;
    }
    public string FName {get;set;}
    public string LName {get;set;}
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return String.Format("{0} {1}", FName,LName);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

you can not return something from a constructor. you can declare a property or a public field, like this

class Animal {

public:
   string FullName;
    .....
}

then you can access FullName by NewAnimal.FullName.

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