Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does 0.1 + 0.1 + 0.1 - 0.3 evaluates to 5.5511151231257827e-17 in Python?

share|improve this question
    
Agreed Precision wil vary... but here 5.5511151231257827e-17 is incorrect!! –  Myth17 Dec 12 '09 at 11:27
3  
While not wanting to take anything away from the answers below, 5.55e-17 is really a small quantity and would be regarded as zero in most practical situations. –  pavium Dec 12 '09 at 11:27
2  
In case you don't understand the notation, the number you see means 0.000000000000000055511151231257827. Very small. –  Artelius Dec 12 '09 at 11:29
6  
0.1 is not representable exactly in any precision of a IEEE-754 floating-point format. You could use 128-bit extended doubles and still have the same problem, only the exponent would be even smaller. –  Pascal Cuoq Dec 12 '09 at 11:30
1  
just for fun I tried it in Python, Lua, Perl and Ruby. they all show the same result: 5.55111512312578e-17 –  Javier Dec 12 '09 at 11:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Because that's how floating point numbers work. If you want precise numbers, use the decimal module. If you want to use floating point numbers, you have to remember to round them to a specific precision when you are displaying them.

>>> print '%.2f' % (0.1+0.1+0.1-0.3,)
0.00
share|improve this answer
1  
Exactly ... and since the other numbers were only specified to 1 decimal place, you can't seriously expect to display 17 decimal places in the answer. –  pavium Dec 12 '09 at 11:35
1  
More precisely, that is how binary floating point numbers work. Numbers represented by the Decimal type in Python are decimal floating point numbers. –  dan-gph Dec 12 '09 at 11:35
    
Yeah, I could be clearer. By "floating point numbers" I meant the float type in Python. –  Lukáš Lalinský Dec 12 '09 at 11:39

This is a problem with floating point numbers in general. See this section on Wikipedia for a description. Roughly speaking - there are rounding errors. Notice that the number you gave us was very small - about 0.00000000000000005551115123 . Here is a more technical paper about the subject.

share|improve this answer

You might be interested in knowing that Python 3 has improved the situation by changing how repr works. It will now give you the shortest string representation that will be converted back to the original float:

Python 3.1.1+ (r311:74480, Oct 11 2009, 20:19:13) 
[GCC 4.3.4] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> 0.1
'0.1'

Older versions behave like this:

Python 2.6.4 (r264:75706, Oct 28 2009, 22:19:17) 
[GCC 4.3.4] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> 0.1
'0.10000000000000001'

It is only the output of repr (called implicitly when you enter a value in the interactive interpreter) that has changed. The underlying values are still IEEE-754 floating-point numbers, and they still have the usual limitations:

Python 3.1.1+ (r311:74480, Oct 11 2009, 20:19:13) 
[GCC 4.3.4] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> 0.1
0.1
>>> 0.2
0.2
>>> 0.3
0.3
>>> 0.1 + 0.2
0.30000000000000004
>>> 0.1 + 0.2 - 0.3
5.551115123125783e-17
share|improve this answer

Because of the way floating points numbers are represented in a computer. It's not just a Python thing.

share|improve this answer
    
[Quote] class Flt { public static void main(String args[]) { float w,x,y,z,ans; w=0.1f; x=w; y=w; z=0.3f; ans=w+x+y-z; System.out.println(ans); } } [/Quote] In java gives 0.0 –  Myth17 Dec 12 '09 at 11:41
3  
Because System.out.println rounds the number, which is exactly what the Python code in my answer does. –  Lukáš Lalinský Dec 12 '09 at 11:44

As an example, consider representing 1/3 as a scientific number in base 10. With only a finite number of digits (say, 10), you'll wind up with a rounding error. Say 1/3 ≈ 0.3333333333e0. Then 1/3+1/3+1/3 (after first converting to decimal expansions) is represented as 0.9999999999e0, but 1 is 1.0e0. Similarly, 1/7 ≈ 0.1428571429e0, and 1/7+1/7 would be 0.2857142858e0, but the representation for 2/7 would be 0.2857142857e0. In both cases, the sum is off by 1e-10.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.