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How to initialize a two-dimensional array in Python?

While working with a two dimentional array, I found that initializing it in a certain way would produce unexpected results. I would like to understand the difference between initializing an 8x8 grid in these two ways:

>>> a =  [[1]*8]*8
>>> a
[[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], \
 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], \
 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], \
 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]]

vs.

>>> A =  [[1 for i in range(8)] for j in range(8)]
>>> A
[[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], \
 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], \
 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], \
 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]]

The unexpected results were that any element accessed with the indeces [0-6][x] would point to the last row in [7][x]. The arrays look identical in the interpreter, hence my confusion. What is wrong with the first approach?

If relevant, these arrays hold references to GTK EventBoxes that represent the squares of a chess board. After changing the initialization approach to the list-comprehension method, the squares respond properly to the intended hover and click events.

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marked as duplicate by Rohit Jain, delnan, John Y, Martijn Pieters, senderle Sep 21 '13 at 14:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
I suspected this may have already been asked and answered. I should have looked better... –  Ярослав Рахматуллин Sep 21 '13 at 13:51
    
Because [1] contains an immutable, you can use [[1] * 8 for _ in range(8)] to generate the required result as well. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 21 '13 at 13:57
    
@MartijnPieters But suppose a = [1, 2] then [a] * 5 is same as [ a for _ range(5)] ? –  Grijesh Chauhan Sep 21 '13 at 14:00
    
@GrijeshChauhan: Yes, That'd be the same thing; a list of 5 references to the same list with value [1, 2]. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 21 '13 at 14:03
1  
@GrijeshChauhan: See gist.github.com/mjpieters/6650955 –  Martijn Pieters Sep 21 '13 at 14:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your first version, you're creating a list containing the number 1 and by multiplying it 8 times create a list containing 8 1s, and using that list 8 times to create a.

So when you change anything in the first version, you'll see that change everywhere else. Your problem being that you're reusing the same instance, something that doesn't happen in the second version.

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I like the conciseness of this answer, because the problem is not very complicated. –  Ярослав Рахматуллин Sep 21 '13 at 14:10

When you create the 2D array using a = [[1]*8]*8 then the * operator creates 8 references to the same object. Therefore, [1]*8 means create an array of size 8 where all 8 elements are the same object (same reference). Since all elements are the same references updating the value to which that reference points will change the value of every element in the array.

Using the list comprehension A = [[1 for i in range(8)] for j in range(8)] ensures that each element in your 2D array is uniquely referenced. This avoids the erroneous behavior you were seeing where all of the elements were updating simultaneously.

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1  
[[1]*8 for j in range(8)] should also work as numbers are immutable –  Veedrac Sep 21 '13 at 14:00
    
perhaps the list elements are references to an internal variable that is being updated. Admittedly, I can't give you the example implementation details. However, I can say, practically speaking, that all 8 indices in the list some how reference the same object. –  bpmason1 Sep 21 '13 at 19:33

maybe refactoring the first way make it eeasier to understand:

one_item = [1]
row = one_item*8
matrix = row*8

as you can see, the array of arrays has eight references to row, which means

(a[0] is a[1]) and (a[1] is a[2]) ...

try this for example:

a = [[1]*8]*8
a[0][0] = 2

b = [[1 for i in range(8)] for j in range(8)]
b[0][0] = 3

print a
print b

print (a[0] is a[1]) and (a[1] is a[2]) and (a[2] is a[3]) # true

print (b[0] is b[1]) and (b[1] is b[2]) and (b[2] is b[3]) # false
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