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I am trying to come up with a Regular Expression that I can use to find lines in a txt file that contain names in ALL CAPS using Notepad++ or similar tool. Once I find a line that matches I want to add three line breaks.

I have various conditions since the lines are names. Some of the names are only two characters. Some have hyphens. Some have multiple names. Some don't have spaces after their last name and comma. Here are some examples:

  • DOE, JOHN L
  • DOE-SMITH, JOHN L
  • DO, JO L
  • DOE, JOHN BOB L
  • DOE,JOHN L

I can run this in other programs as well. Just trying to figure this out so I can get it finished.

EDIT: I was using [A-Z]+, [A-Z]+ but it didn't select the whole line and it didn't account for spaces and hyphens.

ANSWER: The following regex met my needs:

^(?!.*[a-z])(?!.*[0-9]).+$

Part 2 ANSWER: I also made an adjustment in order to do the second part of my request which was to add three line breaks ahead of the matched item.

^((?!.*[a-z\d]).+)$

I also made sure Match Case was selected. It was using Regular Expression. and replaced with the following:

\n\n\n\1

Thanks Everyone!

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1  
Show your current regex! –  Toby Allen Sep 21 '13 at 16:02
    
Added above. Thanks. –  James Bullis Sep 21 '13 at 16:15
    
Hi James, Please add your answer as an answer rather than editing your question. –  Toby Allen Sep 21 '13 at 17:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a negative look ahead for a lowercase char:

^(?!.*[a-z]).+$

This matches "any line that doesn't contain a lowercase letter".


To also disallow numbers:

^(?!.*[a-z\d]).+$
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This is working great, but I also have lines that only contain numbers, so I need to negate numbers. So made a quick addition: ^(?!.*[a-z])(?!.*[0-9]).+$ And it's working like I want it! Thanks. –  James Bullis Sep 21 '13 at 16:11
    
Cool. See edited answer for simpler way to negate numbers too. –  Bohemian Sep 21 '13 at 16:18
    
I didn't account for apostrophe's in a name like AL'JOHN. Can I update this to include those as well? –  James Bullis Sep 21 '13 at 16:33
    
Not sure what you mean by "account for". They are already allowed. If you want to exclude apostrophes too, add ' to the character class: ^(?!.*[a-z\d']).+$. But if the list gets too long, maybe simpler to use a character class for what is allowed instead, like ^[A-Z -,]+$. –  Bohemian Sep 21 '13 at 16:43

Use Extended Regular Expressions with POSIX Character Classes

This will work for your provided corpus using GNU grep. Adapt to suit any changes to your data.

$ grep \
      --extended-regexp \
      --only-matching   \
      --regexp='[[:upper:]-]+, ?[[:upper:]]+' \
      /tmp/corpus 
DOE, JOHN
DOE-SMITH, JOHN
DO, JO
DOE, JOHN
DOE,JOHN

Adding Newline Characters with GNU Sed

You can perform this operation with the append operation in GNU sed. For example:

$ sed \
      --regexp-extended '/[[:upper:]-]+, ?[[:upper:]]+/a\\n\n\n' \
      /tmp/corpus
DOE, JOHN L




DOE-SMITH, JOHN L




DO, JO L




DOE, JOHN BOB L




DOE,JOHN L
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