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I have a problem when the script print the whole line of text file in a result text file:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;
my $out = "result2.txt";
open my $outFile, ">$out" or die $!;
my %permitted = do {
open my $fh, '<', 'f1.txt';
map { /(.+?)\s+\(/, 1 } <$fh>;
};

open my $fh, '<', 'f2.txt';
while (<$fh>) {
my ($phrase) = /(.+?)\s+->/;

if ($permitted{$phrase}) { 
print $outFile $fh;
 }
close $outFile;

The problem is in this line

print $outFile $fh;

Any idea please?

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
You're attempting to print the file handle $fh to $outFile. Change that line to print $outFile $_; –  Kenosis Sep 21 '13 at 16:58
    
With the autodie module, you don't need the or die $!; That's why autodie exists. –  Andy Lester Sep 21 '13 at 20:34

3 Answers 3

print $outFile $fh is printing the value of the file handle $fh to the file handle $outFile. Instead you want to print the entire current line, which is in $_.

There are a couple of other improvements that can be made

  • You should always use the three-parameter form of open, so the open mode appears on its own as the second paremeter

  • There is no need to test the success of an open of autodie is in place

  • If you have a variable that contains the name of the output file, then you really should have ones for the names of the two input files as well

This is how your program should look. I hope it helps.

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my ($in1, $in2, $out) = qw/ f1.txt f2.txt result2.txt /;

my %permitted = do {
  open my $fh, '<', $in1;
  map { /(.+?)\s+\(/, 1 } <$fh>;
};

open my $fh,    '<', $in2;
open my $outfh, '>', $out;

while (<$fh>) {
  my ($phrase) = /(.+?)\s+->/;
  if ($permitted{$phrase}) {
    print $outfh $_;
  }
}

close $outfh;
share|improve this answer

I think you want print $outfile $phrase here, don't you? The line you currently have is trying to print out a file handle reference ($fh) to a file ($outfile).

Also, just as part of perl best practices, you'll want to use the three argument open for your first open line:

 open my $outFile, ">", $out or die $!;

(FWIW, you're already using 3-arg open for your other two calls to open.)

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, No i want to print the whole line of "f2.txt" if the condition is true –  Cyrine Ezzahra Sep 21 '13 at 16:46

Although Borodin has provided an excellent solution to your question, here's another option where you pass your 'in' files' names to the script on the command line, and let Perl handle the opening and closing of those files:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $file2 = pop;
my %permitted = map { /(.+?)\s+\(/, 1 } <>;

push @ARGV, $file2;

while (<>) {
    my ($phrase) = /(.+?)\s+->/;
    print if $permitted{$phrase};
}

Usage: perl script.pl inFile1 inFile2 [>outFile]

The last, optional parameter directs output to a file.

The pop command implicitly removes inFile2's name off of @ARGV, and stores it in $file2. Then, inFile1 is read using the <> directive. The file name of inFile2 is then pushed onto @ARGV, and that file is read and a line is printed if $permitted{$phrase} is true.

Running the script without the last, optional parameter will print results (if any) to the screen. Using the last parameter saves output to a file.

Hope this helps!

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