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I can't get on the right track with this, any help would be appreciated

I have one table

+---+----------+---------+-----------+
|id | match_id | team_id | player_id |
+---+----------+---------+-----------+
| 1 |        9 |      10 |         5 |
| 2 |        9 |      10 |         7 |
| 3 |        9 |      10 |         9 |
| 4 |        9 |      11 |        12 |
| 5 |        9 |      11 |        15 |
| 6 |        9 |      11 |        18 |
+---+----------+---------+-----------+

I want to select these with a where on the match_id and both team id's so the output will be

+---------+-------+------+---------+---------+
| MATCHID | TEAMA | TEAMB| PLAYERA | PLAYERB |
+---------+-------+------+---------+---------+    
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       5 |      12 |
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       7 |      15 |
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       9 |      18 |
+---------+-------+------+---------+---------+

It's probably very simple, but i'm stuck..

thanks in advance

p.s. seemed to forgot a column on my first post, sorry

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1  
Why player #5 and player #12 are in one row? What rule do you use for this? –  alygin Dec 12 '09 at 14:03
    
yup. what governs which two players are on the same row? –  just somebody Dec 12 '09 at 14:06
1  
You should rethink your database design. You'd be better off with one table that links teams to matches and one table to link players to teams. That'll simplify the logic a lot. –  Tatu Ulmanen Dec 12 '09 at 14:11
    
it doesn't matter if 5 and 12 are in one row, it could also be 5 and 15 or 5 and 18 –  michael Dec 12 '09 at 14:25

3 Answers 3

I think you need:

SELECT
    a.match_id, a.team_id AS TeamA, b.team_id AS teamB, 
    a.player_id AS PlayerA, b.player_id AS PlayerB
FROM PLayer AS a
    INNER JOIN Player AS b ON a.match_id = b.match_id
WHERE a.team_id < b.team_id

Though this will give you every pair of players for each game, i.e.

+---------+-------+------+---------+---------+
| MATCHID | TEAMA | TEAMB| PLAYERA | PLAYERB |
+---------+-------+------+---------+---------+    
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       5 |      12 | 
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       5 |      15 |
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       5 |      18 |
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       7 |      12 |
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       7 |      15 |
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       7 |      18 |
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       9 |      12 |
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       9 |      15 |
|       9 |    10 |   11 |       9 |      18 |
+---------+-------+------+---------+---------+

To restrict it further, you need a criterion to determine players should be paired.

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I think it's better to redesign your database.

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-1 Unhelpful; does not point at a better design –  Andomar Dec 12 '09 at 14:58
select MatchA.id as MATCHID, MatchA.team_id as TEAMA, MatchB.team_id as TEAMB, MatchA.player_id as PLAYERA, MatchB.player_id as PLAYERB
from Match as MatchA, match as MatchB 
where MatchA.id = MatchB.id and MatchA.team_id < MatchB.team_id
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1  
The <> will give you team 10 with 11, but also team 11 with 10. –  Paul Dec 12 '09 at 14:11
    
Ah yeah, that's true. –  Kaleb Brasee Dec 12 '09 at 14:32

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