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Im using MCNearbyServiceBrowser and MCNearbyServiceAdvertiser to join two peers to a MCSession. I am able to send data between them using MCSession's sendData method. All seems to be working as expected until I randomly (and not due to any event I control) receive a MCSessionStateNotConnected via the session's MCSessionDelegate didChangeState handler. Additionally, the MCSession's connectedPeers array no longer has my peers.

Two questions: Why? and How do i keep the MCSession from disconnecting?

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I have the same issue but i'am getting disconnected after some data was sent. Have you resolved this? –  Moonkid Oct 9 '13 at 10:55
    
One item I noticed is that pausing in the debugger breaks the MCSession. I ended up coding a mechanism to reestablish the session if it gets dropped. –  tillerstarr Oct 9 '13 at 15:56
    
I have the same problem. I notice if one device is backgrounded and messages are sent to it then disconnects happen. –  PsychoDad Oct 20 '13 at 22:46
    
@tillerstarr how did you reconnect the session? –  PsychoDad Oct 20 '13 at 22:48
    
i'm not automatically reconnecting. Instead I let the user know and then they can reconnect. I stop the advertiser and browser and null the session and then recreate them all. –  tillerstarr Oct 21 '13 at 2:25

3 Answers 3

This is a bug, which I just reported to Apple. The docs claim the didReceiveCertificate callback is optional, but it's not. Add this method to your MCSessionDelegate:

- (void) session:(MCSession *)session didReceiveCertificate:(NSArray *)certificate fromPeer:(MCPeerID *)peerID certificateHandler:(void (^)(BOOL accept))certificateHandler
 {
     certificateHandler(YES);
 }

The random disconnects should cease.

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4  
Still getting disconnects even after implementing this –  PsychoDad Dec 7 '13 at 6:29

UPDATE After using a support ticket to Apple, they confirmed that calling sendData too often and with too much data can cause disconnects.

I have had disconnects when hitting break points and when backgrounding. Since the break points won't happen on the app store, you need to handle the backgrounding case by beginning a background task when your app is about to enter the background. Then end this task when your app comes back to the foreground. On iOS 7 this gives you about 3 background minutes which is better than nothing.

An additional strategy would be to schedule a local notification for maybe 15 seconds before your background time expires by using [[UIApplication sharedApplication] backgroundTimeRemaining], that way you can bring the user back into the app before it suspends and the multi peer framework has to be shutdown. Perhaps the local notification would warn them that their session will expire in 10 seconds or something...

If the background task expires and the app is still in the background, you have to tear down everything related to multi-peer connectivity, otherwise you will get crashes.

- (void) createExpireNotification
{
    [self killExpireNotification];

    if (self.connectedPeerCount != 0) // if peers connected, setup kill switch
    {
        NSTimeInterval gracePeriod = 20.0f;

        // create notification that will get the user back into the app when the background process time is about to expire
        NSTimeInterval msgTime = UIApplication.sharedApplication.backgroundTimeRemaining - gracePeriod;
        UILocalNotification* n = [[UILocalNotification alloc] init];
        self.expireNotification = n;
        self.expireNotification.fireDate = [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSinceNow:msgTime];
        self.expireNotification.alertBody = TR(@"Text_MultiPeerIsAboutToExpire");
        self.expireNotification.soundName = UILocalNotificationDefaultSoundName;
        self.expireNotification.applicationIconBadgeNumber = 1;

        [UIApplication.sharedApplication scheduleLocalNotification:self.expireNotification];
    }
}

- (void) killExpireNotification
{
    if (self.expireNotification != nil)
    {
        [UIApplication.sharedApplication cancelLocalNotification:self.expireNotification];
        self.expireNotification = nil;
    }
}

- (void) applicationWillEnterBackground
{
    self.taskId = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler:^
    {
        [self shutdownMultiPeerStuff];
        [[UIApplication sharedApplication] endBackgroundTask:self.taskId];
        self.taskId = UIBackgroundTaskInvalid;
    }];
    [self createExpireNotification];
}

- (void) applicationWillEnterForeground
{
    [self killExpireNotification];
    if (self.taskId != UIBackgroundTaskInvalid)
    {
        [[UIApplication sharedApplication] endBackgroundTask:self.taskId];
        self.taskId = UIBackgroundTaskInvalid;
    }
}

- (void) applicationWillTerminate
{
    [self killExpireNotification];
    [self stop]; // shutdown multi-peer
}

You'll also want this handler in your MCSession delegate due to Apple bug:

- (void) session:(MCSession*)session didReceiveCertificate:(NSArray*)certificate fromPeer:(MCPeerID*)peerID certificateHandler:(void (^)(BOOL accept))certificateHandler
 {
     if (certificateHandler != nil) { certificateHandler(YES); }
 }
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When backgrounding, can you maintain the connection when bringing the app back from background? –  Jeff Jan 24 at 13:56
    
You can as long as your background time does not run out. If it does, you have no choice but to kill the session or crash. –  PsychoDad Jan 24 at 21:37

There are many causes of this, and the two answers thus far are both correct in my experience. Another which you'll find in other similar questions is this: Only one peer can accept another's invitation.

So, to clarify, if you set up an app where all devices are both advertisers and browsers, any devices can freely invite any others found to join a session. However, between any two given devices, only one device can actually accept the invitation and connect to the other device. If both devices accept each others' invitations they will disconnect within a minute or less.

Note that this limitation does not prevent the desired behavior because - unlike what my intuition stated before I built my multipeer implementation - when one device accepts an invitation and connects to another device they both become connected and receive connection delegate methods and can send each other messages.

Therefore, if you are connecting devices which both browse and advertise, send invitations freely but only accept one of a pair.

The problem of only accepting one of two invitations can be solved a myriad of ways. To begin, understand that you can pass any arbitrary object or dictionary (archived as data) as the context argument in an invitation. Therefore, both devices have access to any arbitrary information about the other (and of course itself). So, you could use at least these strategies:

  • simply compare: the display name of the peerID. But there's no guarantee these won't be equal.
  • store the date your multipeer controller was initialized and use that for comparison
  • give each peer a UUID and send this for comparison (my technique, in which each device - indeed each user of the app on a device - has a persistent UUID it employs).
  • etc - any object which supports both NSCoding and compare: will do fine.
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