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This is my second weekend playing with Node, so this is a bit newbie.

I have a js file full of common utilities that provide stuff that JavaScript doesn't. Severely clipped, it looks like this:

module.exports = {
    Round: function(num, dec) {
        return Math.round(num * Math.pow(10,dec)) / Math.pow(10,dec);
    }
};

Many other custom code modules - also included via require() statements - need to call the utility functions. They make calls like this:

module.exports = {
    Init: function(pie) {
        // does lots of other stuff, but now needs to round a number
        // using the custom rounding fn provided in the common util code
        console.log(util.Round(pie, 2)); // ReferenceError: util is not defined
    }
};

The node.js file that is actually run is very simple (well, for this example). It just require()'s in the code and kicks off the custom code's Init() fn, like this:

var util = require("./utilities.js");
var customCode = require("./programCode.js");

customCode.Init(Math.PI);

Well, this doesn't work, I get a "ReferenceError: util is not defined" coming from the customCode. I know everything in each required file is "private" and this is why the error is occuring, but I also know that the variable holding the utility code object has GOT to be stored somewhere, perhaps hanging off of global?

I searched through global but didn't see any reference to utils in there. I was thinking of using something like global.utils.Round in the custom code.

So the question is, given that the utility code could be referred to as anything really (var u, util, or utility), how in heck can I organize this so that other code modules can see these utilities?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are at least two ways to solve this:

  1. If you need something from another module in a file, just require it. That's the easy one.
  2. Provide something which actually builds the module for you. I will explain this in a second.

However, your current approach won't work as the node.js module system doesn't provide globals as you might expect them from other languages. Except for the things exported with module.exports you get nothing from the required module, and the required module doesn't know anything of the requiree's environment.

Just require it

To avoid the gap mentioned above, you need to require the other module beforehand:

// -- file: ./programCode.js
var util = require(...);

module.exports = {
    Init: function(pie) {
        console.log(util.Round(pie, 2));
    }
};

requires are cached, so don't think too much about performance at this point.

Keep it flexible

In this case you don't directly export the contents of your module. Instead, you provide a constructor that will create the actual content. This enables you to give some additional arguments, for example another version of your utility library:

// -- file: ./programCode.js
module.exports = {
    create: function(util){
      return {
        Init: function(pie) {
          console.log(util.Round(pie, 2));
        }
      }
    }        
};

// --- other file

var util     = require(...);
var myModule = require('./module').create(util);

As you can see this will create a new object when you call create. As such it will consume more memory as the first approach. Thus I recommend you to just require() things.

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Requiring the same library multiple times was not something I saw coming, that's for sure. Its not intuitive for the reasons you mentioned (concerned about duplication and performance). I've tested this through and it works, so thank you for the answer and explanations for it! –  Geek Stocks Sep 21 '13 at 19:13
    
@GeekStocks: Usually I have a look at your tags, but in your case I just assumed that you expected some kind of global management. The require system is more like Python's or Haskell's import or C/C++ #include (but hidden in both cases, as long as you don't export the things again, which leads to your problem - that's the difference to the other systems). –  Zeta Sep 21 '13 at 19:25

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