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I have a map whose key is a pair std::map<std::pair<int, int>, struct A> myMap. How can I find and access the lowest pair for each unique first element in the pair? For example,

struct A a;
myMap.insert(std::make_pair(std::pair<int, int>(1, 200), a));
myMap.insert(std::make_pair(std::pair<int, int>(1, 202), a));
myMap.insert(std::make_pair(std::pair<int, int>(2, 198), a));
myMap.insert(std::make_pair(std::pair<int, int>(2, 207), a));

The keys that I would like to use are <1, 200> and <2, 198>. I don't need them returned together, I just need to do operations on each one.

Thanks for your time!

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1  
If you don't want to walk the through the map detecting when the first element changes, I'd think you'd need a separate map telling you about the locations of these locations. –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 21 '13 at 19:27
    
If this is so important - why not just store the minimum pair when inserting into the list. When delete either mark that value is invalid and hence do a search or do a search there and then –  Ed Heal Sep 21 '13 at 21:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would go for the most straightforward solution:

auto previous_first = 0;
auto is_first_iteration = true;
for (const auto& key_value : myMap) {
  const auto& key = key_value.first;
  const auto& value = key_value.second;
  if (is_first_iteration || key.first != previous_first) {
    is_first_iteration = false;
    previous_first = key.first;
    // do something here!
  }
}

Here you just simply iterate over each element (and we rely on the property of std::map that elements are sorted. And pairs are sorted themselves by the first and then by the second element). On each step we remember the previous first element - if on this step it's the same we just skip this step.

@AndrewDurward points out that this problem can be solved in logarithmic time. This is true only partially. First, this problem can be solved in logarithmic time only in the best case. What if you have N elements and each of them has different first ? You have N elements in the answer and obviously, you cannot output N elements in logarithmic time.

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It should be noted that this is a linear solution whereas the problem can be solved in logarithmic time. It's like investigating every word in a dictionary to find the first entries that begin with each letter. –  Andrew Durward Sep 26 '13 at 14:37
    
This is true only partially. First, this problem can be solved in logarithmic time only in the best case. What if you have N elements and each of them has different first ? Obviously, you cannot output N elements in logarithmic time. The second point is that the solution you proposed doesn't work because map::iterator doesn't work well with std::upper_bound. This code doesn't even compile - map's iterator is not a RandomAccessIterator which is required by std::upper_bound. Yes, you still can implement it but the algorithm will be harder and in most cases not that useful. –  sasha.sochka Sep 26 '13 at 15:01
    
Right, I was thinking the alternative solution was O(lg N) but you correctly point out that it's actually O(k lg N) where k is the number of unique first elements found in the keys. Clearly the choice between O(N) and O(k lg N) will depend on the ratio between k and N. Regarding std::upper_bound however, it requires the iterators only to model ForwardIterator and is therefore guaranteed to work with std::map::iterator -- see here. –  Andrew Durward Sep 26 '13 at 17:05
    
Yup, it was my mistake. I just had no idea how could upper_bound be implemented with ForwardIterator in linear time and here is the answer - it's not! std::upper_bound works in linear time for std::map (or all kinds of ForwardIterator containers). Basicly your solution is the same as mine –  sasha.sochka Sep 26 '13 at 17:16
    
Although cplusplus.com is not the best reference but here is a quote: On non-random-access iterators, the iterator advances produce themselves an additional linear complexity in N on average. –  sasha.sochka Sep 26 '13 at 17:19

You can use a custom comparator

struct comp {
bool operator()(const std::pair<int, int>&x, const std::pair<int, int>& y ) const
{
    return x.second < y.second;
}
};

std::map<std::pair<int, int>, struct A,comp > myMap;

And then find then use find_if with first element of pair.

In your case by std::less<T> by default sorts as expected.

So following will work without custom comparator i.e. with just

std::map<std::pair<int, int>, struct A > myMap;

int search_id=1; //First Element of pair, you can use entire pair too, 
//but that will defeat the purpose of "lowest pair"
auto it=std::find_if(myMap.begin() , myMap.end() , 
                [search_id](const std::pair<std::pair<int, int>, A>& x)
                { return x.first.first == search_id; } 
                );

if(it != myMap.end())
{
std::cout<<it->first.first<<" "<<it->first.second;
}

Edit : You can use it as a function to loop through all elements

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@sasha.sochka ideone.com/KaNZqS –  P0W Sep 21 '13 at 20:07
    
@sasha.sochka I don't get your problem, I'm not here to write code of OP, infact OP can use it for each element. And before you ask I didn't downvote yours. In fact you were not even aware of how find_if works for STL containers –  P0W Sep 21 '13 at 20:10

With a tiny overload helper, you can just use std::lower_bound: Live on Coliru

The first match listed will be the one you looked for (std::pair<> is already order by (first,right), ascending).

The helper, in this case, is:

struct ByKeyFirst final { int value; };
inline bool operator<(Map::value_type const& v, ByKeyFirst target) { 
    return v.first.first < target.value; 
}

As you can see, the only 'added complexity' is in checking that a match was found at all, but efficiency should be fine. And you can always hide the complexity in a (unit-testable) helper:

Map::const_iterator byKeyFirst(Map const& map, int target)
{
    auto const e = end(map);
    auto lbound = lower_bound(begin(map), e, ByKeyFirst { target });
    if (lbound != e && lbound->first.first == target)
        return lbound;
    return e;
}

Now the lookup code becomes merely:

int main()
{
    const Map myMap { 
        { { 1, 200 }, {} },
        { { 1, 202 }, {} },
        { { 2, 198 }, {} },
        { { 2, 207 }, {} },
    };

    auto match = byKeyFirst(myMap, 2);

    if (end(myMap) != match)
        std::cout << "Matching key: (" << match->first.first << "," << match->first.second << ")\n";
}

Full demo

#include <map>
#include <tuple>
#include <limits>

using namespace std;

struct A {};

using Pair = pair<int,int>;
using Map  = map<Pair, A>;

namespace /*anon*/
{
    struct ByKeyFirst final { int value; };
    inline bool operator<(Map::value_type const& v, ByKeyFirst target) { return v.first.first < target.value; }

    Map::const_iterator byKeyFirst(Map const& map, int target)
    {
        // you can just find the first match, Pair is already sorted by `first`, then `second`:
        auto const e = end(map);
        auto lbound = lower_bound(begin(map), e, ByKeyFirst { target });
        if (lbound != e && lbound->first.first == target)
            return lbound;
        return e;
    }
}

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    const Map myMap { 
        { { 1, 200 }, {} },
        { { 1, 202 }, {} },
        { { 2, 198 }, {} },
        { { 2, 207 }, {} },
    };

    auto match = byKeyFirst(myMap, 2);

    if (end(myMap) != match)
        std::cout << "Matching key: (" << match->first.first << "," << match->first.second << ")\n";
}
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Since the map keys are sorted lexicographically, then they can also be viewed as being sorted by their first element (albeit with some duplicates). This means we can leverage any of the standard algorithms that operate on sorted ranges so long as we provide an appropriate predicate. In this case, the predicate that compares the first element of the key can be written as follows:

    typedef std::map<std::pair<int, int>, struct A> myMap_t;

    auto compare_first = [](
        myMap_t::value_type const & p1,
        myMap_t::value_type const & p2 )
    {
        return p1.first.first < p2.first.first;
    };

With that done, we just need to select the correct algorithm to iterate over the desired map elements. We want the first element in the map, then the first element which is not "equivalent" to that one as defined by our predicate. This is exactly what std::upper_bound does.

auto e1 = myMap.begin();
auto e2 = std::upper_bound( e1, myMap.end(), *e1, compare_first );

Or we can loop over them:

for( auto it = myMap.begin(); it != myMap.end(); it = std::upper_bound( it, myMap.end(), *it, compare_first ) )
        std::cout << it->first.first << " " << it->first.second << "\n";

Full code is here.

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std::upper_bound is O(N) for ForwardIterator collections –  sasha.sochka Sep 26 '13 at 19:46
    
@sasha.sochka That's not entirely accurate. It may be O(N) in the number of iterator increments for ForwardIterators but the standard requires that it's never worse than O(lg N) in the number of comparisons performed (see section 25.4.3.2). –  Andrew Durward Sep 26 '13 at 20:47
    
Yes, but O(N) increments + O(lgN) comparsions = O(N) operations. –  sasha.sochka Sep 26 '13 at 20:59

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