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I implemented a counting sort algorithm from pseudocode. In the pseudocode the final loop decrements C[A[j]] after the first pass. This was shifting everything to the right so I debugged and decremented before the first pass to produce the correct results. But I cannot see the reason besides that it works, why I must decrement before and not after.

Here is the result when I decrement after:

10 1 0 6 8 3 2 0 9 4 
0 0 0 1 2 3 4 6 8 9 

And when I decrement before:

10 1 0 6 8 3 2 0 9 4 
0 0 1 2 3 4 6 8 9 10

Obviously since everything was shifted right initially I moved everything left one, but why wouldn't it be in the correct alignment in the first place?

int* counting_sort(int A[], int size, int k)
{
    int* B = new int[size];
    int* C = new int[k+1];
    for(int i = 0; i <= k; i++)
        C[i] = 0;
    for(int j = 0; j < size; j++) {
        C[A[j]]++;
    }
    for(int i = 1; i <= k; i++) {
        C[i] += C[i-1];
    }
    //print(C,k+1);
    for(int j = size-1; j >= 0; j--) {
        B[--C[A[j]]] = A[j];
    }
    delete [] C;
    return B;
}
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2  
Unrelated: Since you're using C++, is there any reason why you don't use std::vector<int> instead of int* and new? – Zeta Sep 21 '13 at 19:57
    
Not really. I use both. – Gene Tunney Sep 21 '13 at 20:03
    
I nearly went blind at B[--C[A[j]]] = A[j]; – Leeor Sep 21 '13 at 20:18
1  
@Comrade Well there are plenty of reasons against using new so don’t use both, use std::vector exclusively. – Konrad Rudolph Sep 21 '13 at 20:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted
for(int j = size-1; j >= 0; j--) {
    B[--C[A[j]]] = A[j];
}

is equivalent to:

for(int j = size-1; j >= 0; j--) {
    int element = A[j];
    int pos = C[element] - 1; 
    B[pos] = element;
    C[element]--;
}

Imagine array 1 0 1. Now counts of elements would be following:
0 - 1 time
1 - 2 times

The preparation of positions increments counts by the amount of elements that precede them:
0 - 1
1 - 3

Position of elements in new (sorted) array is now (count - 1):
position of 0 = 1 - 1 = 0
position of first 1 = 3 - 1 = 2
position of second 1 = 2 - 1 = 1

making it 0 1 1.

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