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I have a question which is connected to this one, which I asked previously: Assignment of a value from a foreach loop . I found out that although the solutions I was provided by friendly users point into the right direction they don't solve my actual problem. Here the sample data set:

td <- data.table(date=c(rep(1,10),rep(2,10)),var=c(rep(1,4),2,rep(1,5)),id=rep(1:10,2))

It is the same as before, but it reflects my real data better What I want to do in words: For each id I want to have the mean for all other ids within a certain period (e.g. mean(td[date=="2004-01-01" & id!=1]$var) but that for all periods and all ids). So it is some kind of nested operation. I tried something like that:

td[,.SD[,mean(.SD$var[-.I]),by=id],by=date]

But that doesn't give the right results.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Update:

 Josh very intelligently suggested to use `.BY ` instead of `.GRP`

td[, td[!.BY, mean(var), by=date], by=id]

Original answer:

If you key by id you can use .GRP in the following way:

setkey(td, id)

## grab all the unique IDs. Only necessary if not all ids are 
##     represented in all dates
uid <- unique(td$id)

td[, td[!.(uid[.GRP]), mean(var), by=date] , by=id]


    id date       V1
 1:  1    1 1.111111
 2:  1    2 1.111111
 3:  2    1 1.111111
 4:  2    2 1.111111
 5:  3    1 1.111111
 6:  3    2 1.111111
 7:  4    1 1.111111
 8:  4    2 1.111111
 9:  5    1 1.000000
10:  5    2 1.000000
11:  6    1 1.111111
12:  6    2 1.111111
13:  7    1 1.111111
14:  7    2 1.111111
15:  8    1 1.111111
16:  8    2 1.111111
17:  9    1 1.111111
18:  9    2 1.111111
19: 10    1 1.111111
20: 10    2 1.111111
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What is the first . in .(uid[.GRP]), and where (if you know) is it documented? –  Josh O'Brien Sep 21 '13 at 20:23
2  
+1. I agree. That's very cool! @JoshO'Brien It's an alias of J, documented at ?J. –  Frank Sep 21 '13 at 20:24
    
@JoshO'Brien the first .belongs to .( ) {plyr style} It is a short hand only. The second . belongs to .GRP which is a reserved word in data.table - I'm not sure if/where it is documented. I see it in the examples at the bottom ?data.table but otherwise, it may not be? –  Ricardo Saporta Sep 21 '13 at 20:25
    
Whoops, just saw Frank's second comment. It is in fact in ?J –  Ricardo Saporta Sep 21 '13 at 20:28
1  
I believe that by using .BY instead of .GRP, you can make this a bit simpler, skipping the assignment to uid and then doing td[, td[!.BY, mean(var), by=date], by=id]. Does that look right? –  Josh O'Brien Sep 21 '13 at 20:52

Does this do it?

DT[,{
    vbar <- mean(var)
    n <- .N
    .SD[,(n*vbar-sum(var))/(n-.N),by=id]
},by='date']

EDIT (Reply to @Arun's comment): The cryptic expression in the middle is the solution to (pseudocode)

mean(everything) = weight(this)*mean(this) + weight(others)*mean(others)

EDIT2 (benchmarking): I prefer Josh/Richardo's answer, but this bit of algebra reduces the number of computations, for when that matters:

require(microbenchmark)
setkey(DT,id)
microbenchmark(
    algebra=DT[,{
        vbar <- mean(var)
        n <- .N
        .SD[,(n*vbar-sum(var))/(n-.N),by=id]
    },by='date'],
    bybyby=DT[, DT[!.BY, mean(var), by=date], by=id]
)
# Unit: milliseconds
#     expr       min        lq    median       uq       max neval
#  algebra  6.448764  6.920922  7.083707  7.38093  64.36238   100
#   bybyby 37.778504 39.425788 41.628918 44.26533 130.85040   100

The user would probably have their DT keyed already, but if not, that also carries a slight cost, I guess.

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