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Surely the same can be accomplished by creating another method with a different name?

public void SayHello(string name)
{
  Console.WriteLine("Hello " + name);
}

public void SayHello(string name, string name2)
{
  Console.WriteLine("Hello  + name + "," + name2);
}

Is the same as

public void SayHelloToTwoPeople(string name1, string name2)
{
  Console.WriteLine("Hello  + name + "," + name2);
}

What is the benefit of method overloading?

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3  
More names == more to memorize. –  Hans Passant Sep 21 '13 at 20:36
2  
You're using Console.WriteLine which has many overloads but isn't it nice to not have to use Console.WriteString, Console.WriteInt64, Console.WriteFloat etc.. for different types? :) –  keyboardP Sep 21 '13 at 20:40
    
@HansPassant I'd prefer to write it as more names => more to memorize. As "more names" is not the same thing as "more to memorize". –  Cruncher Oct 17 '13 at 18:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't need to, however, it helps keep your program consistent. You shouldn't need to explicitly state in your method name that you can say hello to two people, your code should speak for itself.

It should be obvious what

public void SayHello(string person) {
    Console.WriteLine("Hello, " + person);
}

and

public void SayHello(String person1, string person2) {
    Console.WriteLine("Hello, " + person1 + " and, " + person2);
}

does without having to make exceedingly redundant method names.

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So. What about SayHelloToThreePeople or SayHelloTo[random number]People?

It's useful to have one-named-method for each work.

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The benefit in most cases is purely semantic. If two methods do the same thing (but take slightly different arguments) , why name them differently?

If you're reading an API, It's much easier to read it if the methods are grouped according to their overloads.

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A good example that I can think of would be when you have a complicated function that gives the user different ways of performing the same function. You can remove arguments when you want to 'guess' what the user wants.

class ImportantClass
{
    public void SomeMethod()
    {
        SomeMethod(1); // Some default value
    }

    public void SomeMethod(int variable)
    {
        // Do something here
    }
}
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Overloaded methods improve code clarity. When designing complex programs, code changes and some branches become unnecessary. Overloaded methods are added to eliminate complexity and enhance performance.

You can read more at

C# Overload Method

And also from the extract from Jon Skeet's book C# in Depth

C# in Depth : Overloading

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It makes class constructors easier to use because it always has the same name.

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