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Trying to convert existing data access code to async and came across Rx because you can't return Task<IEnumerable<T>> with a yield return in your method body.

I wrote this but not sure its async so pointers gratefully received

public class EmployeeRepository : IEmployeeRepository
{
    public IAsyncEnumerable<Employee> GetEmployees()
    {
        return Enumerable().ToAsyncEnumerable();
    }

    private IEnumerable<Employee> Enumerable()
    {
        using (var connection = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["DBConnString"].ConnectionString))
        {
            connection.Open();
            using (var command = new SqlCommand(@"SELECT * FROM EMPLOYEES", connection))
            {
                using (var reader = command.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    while (reader.Read())
                    {
                        yield return
                            new Employee()
                                {
                                    Id = ReadField<int>(reader, "Id"),
                                    Name = ReadField<string>(reader, "Name")
                                };
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    private static T ReadField<T>(IDataRecord reader, string fieldName)
    {
        var value = reader[fieldName];
        return value == DBNull.Value ? default(T) : (T)value;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean, "you can't return Task<IEnumerable<T>>? Of course you can. Do you mean that your current interface doesn't use that in its method signature? Converting code to async is generally a breaking change, and a pretty major one; you will have to change many interfaces and method signatures. You should even change the names, as it's customary to include the suffix Async at the end of asynchronous methods. –  Aaronaught Sep 21 '13 at 23:16
    
How does the Reactive Framework relate to this question? –  Enigmativity Sep 22 '13 at 6:54
    
You can't return Task<IEnumerable<T>> with yield return –  Jon Sep 22 '13 at 9:08
    
@Enigmativity I'm trying to find a way to do it with yield return and I thought Rx could give me that. –  Jon Sep 22 '13 at 9:08
    
@Jon - yield return only works for IEnumerable<>, not IObservable<>. It's still synchronous if you're using yield return. If you go the Rx route though you could make it async easily, but not yield return then. –  Enigmativity Sep 22 '13 at 9:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is not async. ToAsyncEnumerable creates a simple adapter that blocks on every call to MoveNext. Returning such an async adapter is bad practice, along the same lines as doing a Task.Run(() => BlockingMethod()). It hides an implementation inefficiency from the user which they may have been able to work around in a better way if they knew it existed.

There are no language-integrated yield features for IAsyncEnumerable, but it can be emulated. I have code to do it, but fair warning this creates a bit of overhead:

IAsyncEnumerable<Employee> async = AsyncEnumerableEx.Create<Employee>(
                                                  async (y, cancellationToken) =>
{
    using (var connection = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager
                            .ConnectionStrings["DBConnString"].ConnectionString))
    {
        await connection.OpenAsync(cancellationToken);
        using (var command = new SqlCommand(@"SELECT * FROM EMPLOYEES",
                                            connection))
        {
            using (var reader = await
                                   command.ExecuteReaderAsync(cancellationToken))
            {
                while (await reader.ReadAsync(cancellationToken))
                {
                    await y.YieldReturn(new Employee()
                    {
                        Id = ReadField<int>(reader, "Id"),
                        Name = ReadField<string>(reader, "Name")
                    });
                }
            }
        }
    }
});

If you want to use actual Rx, there is an almost identical Observable.Create utility built into it. It will be somewhat more efficient due to cutting out some await overhead.

IObservable<Employee> async = Observable.Create<Employee>(
                                                    async (obs, cancellationToken) =>
{
    using (var connection = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager
                            .ConnectionStrings["DBConnString"].ConnectionString))
    {
        await connection.OpenAsync(cancellationToken);
        using (var command = new SqlCommand(@"SELECT * FROM EMPLOYEES",
                                            connection))
        {
            using (var reader = await
                                   command.ExecuteReaderAsync(cancellationToken))
            {
                while (await reader.ReadAsync(cancellationToken))
                {
                    obs.OnNext(new Employee()
                    {
                        Id = ReadField<int>(reader, "Id"),
                        Name = ReadField<string>(reader, "Name")
                    });
                }
            }
        }
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
I have this compiling but it only returns 1 employee not an IEnumerable: –  Jon Sep 23 '13 at 9:08
    
How are you using it? I don't see any reason for it to return only a single record if there should be more. –  Cory Nelson Sep 23 '13 at 16:25
    
you have to supply a generic type on the Create<T> so what should that be? It has to be a Task<T> right? GetEmployees should return a Task<T> to be async –  Jon Sep 23 '13 at 16:42
    
Here's a gist. There are 2 items in the DB. It returns only 1. gist.github.com/jchannon/6673506 –  Jon Sep 23 '13 at 16:54
    
Sorry about that, didn't test that code. The generic should be Employee. IObservable is already async, passing tasks through it is almost always going to be incorrect. Post edited. –  Cory Nelson Sep 23 '13 at 17:58

If you want to use Rx, try something like this:

public IObservable<Employee> GetEmployees()
{
    return Observable.Create<Employee>(o =>
        Observable.Using(() => new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager
            .ConnectionStrings["DBConnString"].ConnectionString),
            connection =>
                Observable.Using(() =>
                {
                    connection.Open();
                    return new SqlCommand(
                        @"SELECT * FROM EMPLOYEES", connection);
                },
                    command =>
                        Observable.Using(() => command.ExecuteReader(),
                            reader =>
                                Observable.Generate(
                                    0,
                                    x => reader.Read(),
                                    x => x,
                                    x => new Employee()
                                {
                                    Id = ReadField<int>(reader, "Id"),
                                    Name = ReadField<string>(reader, "Name")
                                }, Scheduler.Default)))).Subscribe(o));
}
share|improve this answer
    
is this async? I see no async/await and Tas<T> returned –  Jon Sep 23 '13 at 12:59
    
@Jon - It's async through the Scheduler.Default, not thru the new async/await keywords. There's not a hint of async in the OP's original question. –  Enigmativity Sep 23 '13 at 14:05
    
This is async in the sense that it happens on a background thread, but not in the sense of having any of the scalability a true async op would have. –  Cory Nelson Sep 23 '13 at 15:50
    
@CoryNelson - it's reading serially from a database. How much scalability do you think it can get? –  Enigmativity Sep 23 '13 at 21:46
    
Quite a bit, but that wasn't my point. This is "pseudo-async" that I mention as bad practice. You can fairly easily rework this sample to use true async. –  Cory Nelson Sep 23 '13 at 23:18

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