Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using basic font loading like this:

WebFont.load({
    google: {
        families: [ 'Droid Sans','Cookie','Parisienne' ]
    }
});

But I need to pass the font names to this as a string. Something like:

var fntstr = "'Droid Sans','Cookie','Parisienne'";
WebFont.load({
    google: {
        families: [ fntstr ]
    }
});

Why doesn't this work? Isn't that just a json structure being passed to Webfont.load?

share|improve this question
    
Why a string? The parameter is an array so why not just create an array of font family names? –  jeff Sep 21 '13 at 22:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your first example, families is an array containing 3 strings.

['Droid Sans','Cookie','Parisienne']

In your second example, families is an array containing 1 string.

["'Droid Sans','Cookie','Parisienne'"]

To make this work, you want to do something like the following:

var fntstr = "'Droid Sans','Cookie','Parisienne'";
var fntarr = fntstr.split(',');
WebFont.load({
    google: {
        families: fntarr
    }
});

The split method will split your string at each comma and create an array with the elements.

http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_split.asp

share|improve this answer
    
Please don't reference w3schools as it contains a lot of erroneous information and the examples are of extremely poor quality. –  jeff Sep 22 '13 at 1:10
    
Can't I just create an array then instead of splitting? var fntstr = ['Droid Sans','Cookie','Parisienne']; –  Doug Wolfgram Sep 22 '13 at 2:04
    
@DougWolfgram You can just create an array like that. I added the split method so you could use the string in your example. –  woodedlawn Sep 22 '13 at 5:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.