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While trying to optimize my code, I found some logical operations were slower than I expected when compared to similar operations on integer or numeric.

So I went onto rewriting basic boolean operators !, &, |, xor as follows:

my.not <- function(x) as.logical(1L - as.integer(x))
my.and <- function(e1, e2) as.logical(as.integer(e1) * as.integer(e2))
my.or  <- function(e1, e2) as.logical(as.integer(e1) + as.integer(e2))
my.xor <- function(e1, e2) as.logical(as.integer(e1) + as.integer(e2) == 1L)

Testing that everything works as expected:

a <- sample(c(TRUE, FALSE), 1e6, TRUE)
b <- sample(c(TRUE, FALSE), 1e6, TRUE)

identical(!a, my.not(a))             # TRUE
identical(a & b, my.and(a, b))       # TRUE
identical(a | b, my.or(a, b))        # TRUE
identical(xor(a, b), my.xor(a, b))   # TRUE

Now benchmarking:

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(!a, my.not(a),
               a & b, my.and(a, b),
               a | b, my.or(a, b),
               xor(a, b), my.xor(a, b))

# Unit: milliseconds
#          expr       min        lq    median         uq       max neval
#            !a  1.237437  1.459042  1.463259   1.492671  17.28209   100
#     my.not(a)  6.018455  6.263176  6.414515  15.291194  70.16313   100
#         a & b 32.318530 32.667525 32.769014  32.973878  50.55528   100
#  my.and(a, b)  8.010022  8.592776  8.750786  18.145590  78.38736   100
#         a | b 32.030545 32.383769 32.506937  32.820720 102.43609   100
#   my.or(a, b) 12.089538 12.434793 12.663695  22.046841  32.19095   100
#     xor(a, b) 94.892791 95.480200 96.072202 106.104000 164.19937   100
#  my.xor(a, b) 13.337110 13.708025 14.048350  24.485478  29.75883   100

Looking at the results, the ! operator is the only one that seems to do a decent job versus my own. The other three are a few times slower. A bit embarrassing for Primitive functions. I even expect that well implemented boolean operators should be a lot faster than operations on integers (how I implemented my own functions.)

Question: Why? Bad implementation? Or maybe the primitive functions are doing some good things (e.g. error checking, special cases) that my functions are not?

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11  
Don't forget about NAs, e.g., NA|TRUE, NA|FALSE and names c(x=TRUE) –  Martin Morgan Sep 22 '13 at 1:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Looking at the C implementation a little, the logical and math operations implement their loops differently. The logical operations do something like (in logic.c:327)

library(inline)

or1 <- cfunction(c(x="logical", y="logical"), "
    int nx = LENGTH(x), ny = LENGTH(y), n = nx > ny ? nx : ny;
    SEXP ans = PROTECT(allocVector(LGLSXP, n));
    int x1, y1;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        x1 = LOGICAL(x)[i % nx];
        y1 = LOGICAL(y)[i % ny];
        if ((x1 != NA_LOGICAL && x1) || (y1 != NA_LOGICAL && y1))
            LOGICAL(ans)[i] = 1;
        else if (x1 == 0 && y1 == 0)
            LOGICAL(ans)[i] = 0;
        else
            LOGICAL(ans)[i] = NA_LOGICAL;
    }
    UNPROTECT(1);
    return ans;
")

where there are two modulo operators % each iteration. In contrast the arithmetic operations (in Itermacros.h:54) do something like

or2 <- cfunction(c(x="logical", y="logical"), "
    int nx = LENGTH(x), ny = LENGTH(y), n = nx > ny ? nx : ny;
    SEXP ans = PROTECT(allocVector(LGLSXP, n));
    int x1, y1, ix=0, iy=0;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        x1 = LOGICAL(x)[ix];
        y1 = LOGICAL(x)[iy];
        if (x1 == 0 || y1 == 0)
            LOGICAL(ans)[i] = 0;
        else if (x1 == NA_LOGICAL || y1 == NA_LOGICAL)
            LOGICAL(ans)[i] = NA_LOGICAL;
        else
            LOGICAL(ans)[i] = 1;

        if (++ix == nx) ix = 0;
        if (++iy == ny) iy = 0;
    }
    UNPROTECT(1);
    return ans;
")

performing two tests for identity. Here's a version that skips the test for NA

or3 <- cfunction(c(x="logical", y="logical"), "
    int nx = LENGTH(x), ny = LENGTH(y), n = nx > ny ? nx : ny;
    SEXP ans = PROTECT(allocVector(LGLSXP, n));
    int x1, y1, ix=0, iy=0;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        x1 = LOGICAL(x)[ix];
        y1 = LOGICAL(y)[iy];
        LOGICAL(ans)[i] = (x1 || y1);
        if (++ix == nx) ix = 0;
        if (++iy == ny) iy = 0;
    }
    UNPROTECT(1);
    return ans;
")

and then a version that avoids the LOGICAL macro

or4 <- cfunction(c(x="logical", y="logical"), "
    int nx = LENGTH(x), ny = LENGTH(y), n = nx > ny ? nx : ny;
    SEXP ans = PROTECT(allocVector(LGLSXP, n));
    int *xp = LOGICAL(x), *yp = LOGICAL(y), *ansp = LOGICAL(ans);
    for (int i = 0, ix = 0, iy = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        *ansp++ = xp[ix] || yp[iy];
        ix = (++ix == nx) ? 0 : ix;
        iy = (++iy == ny) ? 0 : iy;
    }
    UNPROTECT(1);
    return ans;
")

Here are some timings

microbenchmark(my.or(a, b), a|b, or1(a, b), or2(a, b), or3(a, b), or4(a, b))
Unit: milliseconds
        expr       min        lq    median       uq      max neval
 my.or(a, b)  8.002435  8.100143 10.082254 11.56076 12.05393   100
       a | b 23.194829 23.404483 23.860382 24.30020 24.96712   100
   or1(a, b) 17.323696 17.659705 18.069139 18.42815 19.57483   100
   or2(a, b) 13.040063 13.197042 13.692152 14.09390 14.59378   100
   or3(a, b)  9.982705 10.037387 10.578464 10.96945 11.48969   100
   or4(a, b)  5.544096  5.592754  6.106694  6.30091  6.94995   100

The difference between a|b and or1 reflects things not implemented here, like attributes and dimensions and special handling of objects. From or1 to or2 reflects the cost of different ways of recycling; I was surprised that there were differences here. From or2 to or3 is the cost of NA-safety. It's a little hard to know whether the additional speed-up in or4 would be seen in a base R implementation -- in user C code LOGICAL() is a macro, but in base R it's an inlined function call.

The code was compiled with -O2 flags and

> system("clang++ --version")
Ubuntu clang version 3.0-6ubuntu3 (tags/RELEASE_30/final) (based on LLVM 3.0)
Target: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix

Times of my.or were not particularly consistent between independent R sessions, sometimes taking quite a bit longer; I'm not sure why. The timings above were with R version 2.15.3 Patched (2013-03-13 r62579); current R-devel seemed about 10% faster.

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3  
Thanks for the in-depth R internals archaeology -- it's always enlightening exploring how things are done in the guts of R. –  Kevin Ushey Sep 22 '13 at 7:51
2  
Maybe worth bringing up on r-devel –  hadley Sep 22 '13 at 16:19

Also, don't forget that in R, logicals are stored as integers in the memory. So it makes sense to not have a huge improvement in speed.

> a=rep(TRUE,1000)
> b=rep(1L,1000)
> c=rep(1,1000)
> class(a)
[1] "logical"
> class(b)
[1] "integer"
> class(c)
[1] "numeric"
> object.size(a)
4040 bytes
> object.size(b)
4040 bytes
> object.size(c)
8040 bytes
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try rep(TRUE, 1000), rep(1L, 1000), rep(1, 1000). –  flodel Feb 13 at 17:12
    
Yes, I said integer but in my code I compared to numeric, I expanded the code to clarify. –  Tiago Zortea Feb 14 at 14:48

While I like your methods a lot and love the speed increase, sadly they lose their ability when e1 e2 have structure more complex than a vector.

> dim(a) <- c(1e2, 1e4)
> dim(b) <- c(1e2, 1e4)
> 
> identical(!a, my.not(a))            
[1] FALSE
> identical(a & b, my.and(a, b))       
[1] FALSE
> identical(a | b, my.or(a, b))        
[1] FALSE
> identical(xor(a, b), my.xor(a, b))   
[1] FALSE

STRUCTURE / DIMENSIONALITY

The logical functions preserve structure and attributes, which is costly, but is of value.

T <- TRUE; F <- FALSE
A <- matrix(c(T, F, T, F), ncol=2)
B <- matrix(c(T, F, F, T), ncol=2)

> A & B
      [,1]  [,2]
[1,]  TRUE FALSE
[2,] FALSE FALSE

> my.and(A, B)
[1]  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE

NA Handling

Also, as pointed out in the comments, NAs also need to be accounted for -- ie, more overhead.

a <- c(T, F, NA, T)
b <- c(F, NA, T, T)
>     identical(!a, my.not(a))    
[1] TRUE
>     identical(a & b, my.and(a, b))       
[1] FALSE
>     identical(a | b, my.or(a, b))        
[1] FALSE
>     identical(xor(a, b), my.xor(a, b))   
[1] TRUE

ATTRIBUTES

a <- c(T, F, NA, T)
b <- c(F, NA, T, T)

names(a) <- names(b) <- LETTERS[23:26]

> a & b
    W     X     Y     Z 
FALSE FALSE    NA  TRUE 

> my.and(a, b)
[1] FALSE    NA    NA  TRUE

Not Speed

Of course, with all that being said, your functions offer a heck of an increase! If you know you dont have to worry about NAs and the likes, and you dont care about structure, then why not just use those!

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