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Background:

My current program is based around a UI module which is connected to various data analysis and generation modules. Data is generated, analysed and sent to the UI, where the data can then be manipulated and put back through the analysis modules, which then in turn refreshes the UI. However, this requires importing data from the UI module into the Analysis module, and then pulling that analysed data back into the interface, which appears to be creating a new instance of the program with every alteration- which of course was not my intention. This is the first interface I have written that relies on several of my own modules being imported simultaneously, earlier interfaces were either self contained or had limited sharing of data between modules.

Question:

What is the most efficient way to pass information between modules? And what's the best way to avoid creating 'feedback' loops (as demonstrated in my simplified example below)?

Example:

from Tkinter import *
#Example Data_UI module
class Interface_On: 
    def Interface_Elements(self, master):
        self.master=master
        self.master.title("'Feedback' Loop")
        self.c=Canvas(self.master, width=1000, height=1000, bg='black')
        self.c.grid(row=0, rowspan=25, column=0)
        drawing_utility_run=Canvas_Draw()
        drawing_utility_run.canvas_objects(self.c)      

class Canvas_Draw:

    def canvas_objects(self, canvas):
        global new_x, new_y
        self.canvas=canvas
        new_x=[]
        new_y=[]
        from Data_Presets import a
        import Data_Generator
        Generator_run=Data_Generator.Generator()
        Generator_run.generator()       
        from Data_Generator import coordinates_x, coordinates_y
        import Data_Processor
        Process_Data=Data_Processor.Data_Processor()
        Process_Data.Process_Data()
        from Data_Processor import data_set, analysed_set, filtered_set
        for i in range(len(data_set)):
        self.canvas.create_oval(coordinates_x, coordinates_y, coordinates_x+a, coordinates_y+a, ...)

    def move_point:

        #interactive objects etc etc
        new_x.append(event.x) #etc

root=Tk()
run_it=Interface_On()
run_it.Interface_Elements(root)
root.mainloop()

#Seperate Data Analysis module
class Data_Processor:
def Process_Data(self):
    from Data_UI import new_x, new_y #This appears to create the unwanted loop
    #Data Analysis etc
            #What is the most efficient way to get data from the UI into this module and avoid creating a new instance of the UI?


Thank you in advance for any help- I've been trying to teach myself Python on and off over the last year, but without formal trained/experienced guidance, I've missed little things like this. Thanks again :)

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2 Answers 2

I would do it the other way around and have Data_Processor call/instantiate the GUI class (I am assuming that the GUI also generates the data). Since it knows about this class it has access to variables so no passing necessary. In any case, you want one class/module that handles the data and the other class(es) access that data without any passing as is done below while printing variables from both classes.

There is no need to create the class, Canvas_Draw, just include those two functions under Interface_On. Also note that you should be using instance objects/variables instead of globals as the example below shows. A beginning tutorial on classes http://www.freenetpages.co.uk/hp/alan.gauld/tutclass.htm

class GUI:
    def __init__(self):
        self.x = 3
        self.y = 4

    def print_test_gui(self):
        print self.x, self.y

    def increment_vars(self):
        self.x -= 1
        self.y -= 1

class Data_Processor:
    def __init__(self):
        self.x=1
        self.y=2
        self.GI= GUI()
        self.print_test()
        self.increment_vars()
        self.print_test()
        self.GI.increment_vars()
        self.print_test()

    def print_test(self):
        print "this x and y =", self.x, self.y
        print "GUI x and y  =", self.GI.x, self.GI.y
        self.GI.print_test_gui()
        print

    def increment_vars(self):
        self.x += 1
        self.y += 1

DP=Data_Processor()
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Thanks for your input :) My data generator is a seperate module, as is my data processor, they're quite large programs in their own right, I'm effectively looking for the best way to create a hub through which everything from several separate modules passes... –  MarkyD43 Sep 23 '13 at 13:33

You can reverse the above code and have the GUI call the others. What is the flow? Do you click a button in the GUI to generate more data, or is there just one set of data generated?

try:
    import Tkinter as tk     ## Python 2.x
except ImportError:
    import tkinter as tk     ## Python 3.x

class GUI:
    def __init__(self):
        root = tk.Tk()
        self.x = 3
        self.y = 4

        self.descr = tk.StringVar()
        tk.Label(root, textvariable=self.descr).grid()
        tk.Button(root, text='"Generate" Data', 
                  command=self.increment_vars).grid(row=1)
        self.dp = Data_Processor()
        self.increment_vars()

        root.mainloop()

    def print_test_gui(self):
        print self.x, self.y

    def increment_vars(self):
        self.x -= 1
        self.y -= 1
        self.dp.increment_vars()
        self.descr.set("GUI=%s, %s  Data=%s, %s" %
                      (self.x, self.y, self.dp.x, self.dp.y))

class Data_Processor:
    def __init__(self):
        self.x=1
        self.y=2
        self.print_test()

    def print_test(self):
        print "this x and y =", self.x, self.y

    def increment_vars(self):
        self.x += 1
        self.y += 1

G=GUI()
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