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[There are other similar questions on this topic, but none of them answer the question I'm asking here, AFAICT. (I.e. the answers I have read all explain why a particular construct fails to do with the questioner is trying to do, and in some cases they offer alternative ways to get the desired results. But no thread answers the question of how to achieve true inheritance from Error.prototype.)]

The best I've managed to do is still basically useless:

function MyErr(message) {
  var tmp = Error.apply(this, arguments);
  for (var prop in tmp) { this[prop] = tmp[prop]; }
}
MyErr.prototype = Object.create(Error.prototype);

Even after "manually" copying properties (a sure sign of a "busted inheritance"), the object returned by new MyErr("whatever") is still not even remotely close to what I would consider "an instance that inherits from Error.prototype". The deviations from expected behavior are really too many to list here—they pop up everywhere I look!—, but, for starters,

console.log((new Error("some error")).toString())     // "Error: some error"
console.log((new MyErr("another error")).toString())  // "Error"
                                                      // expected
                                                      // "MyError: another error"

console.log((new Error("some error")).constructor)    // "Error()"
console.log((new MyErr("another error")).constructor) // "Error()"
                                                      // expected:
                                                      // "MyError()"

(In case anyone is wondering, no, constructor is not one of the properties that gets copied in MyErr's for loop. I checked.)

Can an object truly inherit from Error.prototype?

Given that to answer the analogous question for Array requires a lengthy treatise, I can't reasonably expect a full answer to my question here, but I hope I can get a pointer to such full answer.


UPDATE: I tried out Bergi's proposal. Below I provide a full, self-contained implementation.1

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html><head><meta charset="utf-8"></head><body>
  <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.min.js"></script>
  <script>
    jQuery(document).ready(function ($) {
      function MyErr(message) {
        var tmp = Error.apply(this, arguments);
        Object.getOwnPropertyNames(tmp).forEach(function(p) {
          console.log('property: ' + p);
          Object.defineProperty(this, p,
                                Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(tmp, p));
        }, this);
        console.log('done creating ' + this);
      }
      MyErr.prototype = Object.create(Error.prototype, {
        constructor: {value:MyErr, configurable:true},
        name: {value:"MyErr", configurable:true}
      });

      var error = new Error("some error");
      var myerr = new MyErr("another error");

      console.log(error.toString());
      console.log(myerr.toString());

      console.log(error.constructor);
      console.log(myerr.constructor);
    });
  </script></body></html>

The output I get in the Firebug console is this:

done creating MyErr                                         testjs.html (line 13)
Error: some error                                           testjs.html (line 23)
MyErr                                                       testjs.html (line 24)
Error()                                                     testjs.html (line 26)
MyErr(message)                                              testjs.html (line 27)

Note in particular that the output does not include any lines beginning with property:. This means that the console.log statement within the forEach loop in MyErr never gets executed (and presumably the same goes for the rest of the forEach callback).

If I replace the forEach loop with

        for (var p in tmp) {
          console.log('property: ' + p);
          Object.defineProperty(this, p,
                                Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(tmp, p));
        };

...then three new lines get prepended to the output (line numbers omitted):

property: fileName
property: lineNumber
property: columnNumber

This shows that not even message is among the tmp properties accessible this way (though message does show up among tmp's properties in Firebug's variable inspector, along with a bazillion of other ones that are also not shown in the console output above).

Also, the explicitly-set name property does make an appearance in the output of myerr.toString(), but still this method does not behave in the same way as error.toString().

I do get the expected output from myerr.toString() if I add the following line at the end of the MyErr function:

this.message = message;

...but I get little comfort from this, because this maneuver, along with most of the other maneuvers I've shown above, have been ad hoc kluges aimed at the specific examples that I posted, but these were intended only as an illustration of what appears to be a deeper problem, namely a complete breakdown of the expected inheritance model.

The purpose of this question is to find out how to achieve "true inheritance" from Error.prototype, and if that is not possible, then to simulate it as closely as possible, having a clear picture of the extent to which the simulation fails to implement the full inheritance model. I stress that the latter of these two alternatives should not be confused with the strategy of incrementally patching some flawed implementation every time we happen to notice some new way in which it fails to conform to expectation. This "incremental patching" approach provides the ideal environment for silent bugs, and is thus a recipe for insanity.


UPDATE2: There seems to be no end to JS's unpredictability. I just discovered that, at least in the Firebug console, Object.getOwnPropertyNames produces a different value depending on whether its argument is a non-atomic expression or a variable to which the same non-atomic expression has been previously assigned.     wtf?

For example, the following is copy-pasted directly from an interaction in the Firebug console (I've added one empty line before each command, for ease of reading):

>>> Object.getOwnPropertyNames(new Error("not assigned"))
[]

>>> errorvar = new Error("assigned")
Error: assigned
(no source for debugger eval code)

>>> Object.getOwnPropertyNames(errorvar)
["fileName", "lineNumber", "message", "stack"]

(The output right after the assignment to errorvar seems to have to do with the fact that an Error object was created, even though it was not thrown. The same output appears even if one deletes everything to the left of new in that line.)

And if that were not enough, if I run this from within a script

console.log(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(new Error("not assigned")))
var errorvar = new Error("assigned");
console.log(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(errorvar));

the output in the Firebug console is

[ ]
[ ]

I don't know if this erratic behavior is due to ECMAScript5, or JavaScript, or Firefox, or Firebug, or what, but it's driving me insane...


1 I posted this self-contained implementation to encourage others to try it out. If there is one thing I have learned about JavaScript is that, no matter how simple the code, and no matter how much you think you know about JavaScript, the only way to know what some JavaScript code is going to do is to run it. Sadly, JavaScript programming still remains an embarrassingly experimental activity. JS is not for the armchair programmer! :)

share|improve this question
    
See stackoverflow.com/q/8802845/218196. –  Felix Kling Sep 22 '13 at 11:54
    
@FelixKling: Thanks. I have read those, and other similar SO threads. They all explain why a particular construct fails to work. This does not address my question. My question is "how can I implement an object that fully inherits from Error.prototype". Please see the article on Array that I linked for an example of what I'm trying to achieve with Error. –  kjo Sep 22 '13 at 12:04
1  
error has native code ctor and methods. You can only a) extend the error object, or write wrappers which do what you want and internally use the Error object. –  MichaC Sep 22 '13 at 12:55
1  
The firebug and chrome consoles are magical environments that don't have entirely same properties as normal js environments. One thing in particular that has bitten me in chrome console is that objects are retained forever if you set them to null in console. –  Esailija Sep 23 '13 at 10:46

4 Answers 4

Well I don't know what else you could need apart from the stack trace and instanceof. Try this:

function MyError(message) {
    this.name = this.constructor.name;
    this.message = message;
    if (Error.captureStackTrace) {
        Error.captureStackTrace(this, this.constructor);
    } else {
        var stack = new Error().stack;
        if (typeof stack === "string") {
            stack = stack.split("\n");
            stack.shift();
            this.stack = stack.join("\n");
        }
    }
}
MyError.prototype = Object.create(Error.prototype, {
    constructor: {
        value: MyError,
        writable: true,
        configurable: true
    }
});
try {
    throw new MyError("message");
} catch (e) {
    console.log(e + "");
    console.log(e.stack + "");
}
try {
    throw new Error("message");
} catch (e) {
    console.log(e + "");
    console.log(e.stack + "");
}

http://jsfiddle.net/VjAC7/1/

Chrome

MyError: message
MyError: message
    at window.onload (http://fiddle.jshell.net/VjAC7/1/show/:44:11)
Error: message
Error: message
    at window.onload (http://fiddle.jshell.net/VjAC7/1/show/:51:11)

Firefox

MyError: message
window.onload@http://fiddle.jshell.net/VjAC7/1/show/:44
Error: message
window.onload@http://fiddle.jshell.net/VjAC7/1/show/:51

IE10

Error: message 
Error: message
    at onload (http://fiddle.jshell.net/VjAC7/1/show/:44:5) 
Error: message 
Error: message
    at onload (http://fiddle.jshell.net/VjAC7/1/show/:51:5) 
share|improve this answer

To me it seems as if the Object created below inherits all the properties of the Error object and behaves identically... Perhaps you can explain how/if it differs?

var MyErr = function(message) {
  this.name = 'My Error';
  this.message = message;
}
MyErr.prototype = new Error();
MyErr.prototype.constructor = MyErr;

throw new MyErr('Uhoh!') // My Error: Uhoh!

On the prototype I can see get stack and set stack inhertited from Error.

share|improve this answer
    
I posted explicit examples showing how the actual behavior differs from expected behavior. –  kjo Sep 22 '13 at 12:06
    
@kjo Sorry, I guess I don't understand the discrepancies you're referring to. –  Jivings Sep 22 '13 at 12:08

Use this:

function MyErr(message) {
  var tmp = Error.apply(this, arguments);
  Object.getOwnPropertyNames(tmp).forEach(function(p) {
    Object.defineProperty(this, p, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(tmp, p));
  }, this);
}
MyErr.prototype = Object.create(Error.prototype, {
  constructor: {value:MyErr, configurable:true},
  name: {value:"MyErr", configurable:true}
});

This will copy even non-enumerable properties from tmp to this, it will reset the .constructor property and it will set the .name property as expected by .toString.

> (new MyErr("another error")).toString()
"MyErr: another error"
> (new MyErr("another error")).constructor
Function MyErr
share|improve this answer
    
thanks; see my UPDATE above –  kjo Sep 22 '13 at 14:02
    
That's odd. Can you post what version of FF you are using? –  Bergi Sep 22 '13 at 18:09
    
23.01 on Windows 7; what results do you get with the self-contained implementation I posted? –  kjo Sep 22 '13 at 22:04

Instead of trying to inherit from error, try to extend a new error object and return it I wrote a quick example how to achieve this here: http://jsfiddle.net/Elak/tvXqC/2/

Basically you can extend your returned object and also overwrite the error name (which then gets used in console or wherever you log that error

var Errors = {};
(function(){
    var myError = function(message){
        return $.extend(new Error(arguments[0]),{
            printExample : function(){
                $("#out").html("Error: " + this.name + ": " + this.message);
            }
        },
        // overwriting error object properties. default for name is Error...
        // this way you can control the log output
        {
            name: "ExceptionNameWhichWillShowInLog"
        }
        );
    };
    Errors.MyError = myError;
})();

the object with the function printExample is now the place for your own methods (replaces the prototype implementation...).

You have actually the same access to this where this is now the instance of a "real" error object and you can do with that instance whatever you want...

share|improve this answer

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