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I'm a C#/Java developer learning Objective C. At first I assumed "messages" were just a different name for method calls, so:

[person jumpInTheAir];

would just be the Objective C syntax for writing

person.jumpInTheAir();

But now I've read here and here and various other places that the concepts are actually not the same and can have different behaviours/advantages. However I'm still uncertain why the language designers would choose a messaging system over a more direct method calling system as in C# and Java.

What advantages do messages bring to the Objective C programming language?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

At first I assumed "messages" were just a different name for method calls,

Yes and no. "Messages" are the Smalltalk and Objective-C terminology for method calls. The thing is, it's not only the terminology that differs, but the actual implementation too. There are 8 different possible combinations for matching the terminology, the syntax and the implementation, like this:

+-------------------+----------------------+--------------------+
|    terminology    |        syntax        |   implementation   |
+-------------------+----------------------+--------------------+
|  "method call"    | Simula (o.method())  |  static binding    | non-virtual C++ methods
+-------------------+----------------------+--------------------+
|  "method call"    | Simula               |  dynamic binding   |
+-------------------+----------------------+--------------------+
|  "method call"    | Smalltalk ([o meth]) |  static binding    |
+-------------------+----------------------+--------------------+
|  "method call"    | Smalltalk            |  dynamic binding   |
+-------------------+----------------------+--------------------+
| "message passing" | Simula               |  static binding    |
+-------------------+----------------------+--------------------+
| "message passing" | Simula               |  dynamic binding   |
+-------------------+----------------------+--------------------+
| "message passing" | Smalltalk            |  static binding    |
+-------------------+----------------------+--------------------+
| "message passing" | Smalltalk            |  dynamic binding   | Objective-C
+-------------------+----------------------+--------------------+

The combination the language designer choses is just a matter of taste.

I'm still uncertain why the language designers would choose a messaging system over a more direct method calling system

Because it has some advantages, such as runtime interposition and introspection -- one can query and modify the behavior of classes, methods and objects at runtime. In the implementation of Objective-C, this have been done in a way such that it is very cheap, it has almost no overhead.

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H2CO3 pointed out in his answer that there are three things I might be referring to when I say "messages": Terminology, Syntax and Implementation.

Terminology and Syntax are down to personal taste, but implementation (static/dynamic binding) has some real consequences.

Pros:

  • Dynamic binding can be used to add new methods to an existing class without subclassing. This seems to be a possible replacement for those used to C# Extension Methods.
  • It lets you inspect the methods available and change their implementation at runtime. See Reflection and Method Swizzling in Objective C.

Cons:

  • It can be argued that the extra layer adds complexity to both the syntax and usage.
  • Dynamic binding adds some overhead over static typing, but this is rarely the bottleneck and it seems there are ways of getting around the overhead if it is really critical.
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