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What am I doing wrong here?

function F2()
{
    for(i = 1; i < 7; i++)
        {
        ('zone'+i+'Data') = ('1'+document.getElementById('Z'+i+'Operate').value +
        document.getElementById('Z'+i+'OnTimeH').value +
        document.getElementById('Z'+i+'OnTimeM').value +
        document.getElementById('Z'+i+'Duration').value +
        document.getElementById('Z'+i+'Repeat').value +
        document.getElementById('Z'+i+'Extra').value);

        ('op'+i).innerHTML = ('zone'+i+'Data');
        }
}

zone1Data, zone2Data, etc are declared externally. If I don't run the loop and use zone1Data = rather than ('zone'+i+'Data') = it works ok so I think it is something wrong with my syntax for this .... and probably also the last line too.

Any ideas how to do this??

share|improve this question
    
Is ('zone'+i+'Data') a variable name? I don't think that is allowed. –  Harry Sep 22 '13 at 14:24
    
@Harry Zone1Data is a variable name, I thought I could put it together like this. –  Simon_A Sep 22 '13 at 14:29
    
I see. By the way Patrick Evans has already posted the solution below. –  Harry Sep 22 '13 at 14:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
('zone'+i+'Data') =

is an invalid way to assign dynamic variables

use array notation with the variable name to create a new variable

window['zone'+i+'Data'] = "something";
this['zone'+i+'Data'] = "something"
someOtherObject['zone'+i+'Data'] = "something";

you can then use dot notation to access it

console.log( window.zone0Data );
console.log( this.zone0Data );
console.log( someOtherObject.zone0Data );

I would avoid the window one as that would pollute the global namespace

And as Ingo Bürk mentions it would be better to put these into an array

var zoneData = new Array();

for(i = 1; i < 7; i++) {
   zoneData[i] = ('1'+document.getElementById('Z'+i+'Operate').value +
        document.getElementById('Z'+i+'OnTimeH').value +
        document.getElementById('Z'+i+'OnTimeM').value +
        document.getElementById('Z'+i+'Duration').value +
        document.getElementById('Z'+i+'Repeat').value +
        document.getElementById('Z'+i+'Extra').value);
}

and each zone data will be accessible by its index

console.log(zoneData[1]);
console.log(zoneData[2]);
share|improve this answer
1  
Better yet, avoid dynamically naming variables and simply use arrays. Dynamic variable names are terrible practice since names are an internal detail that should not matter to the functionality. If it does, rethink your design. –  Ingo Bürk Sep 22 '13 at 14:30
    
@Patrick Evans - Thank you I will try the array, as you and Ingo say it is a better way. –  Simon_A Sep 22 '13 at 14:37

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