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Here's an example of the problem I'm having:

package main

import "fmt"

func foo(a int, b ...int) {
    fmt.Println(a,b)
}

func main() {
    a := 0
    aa := 1
    b := []int{2,3,4}
    foo(a, aa, b...)
}

When I run this I get the error too many arguments in call to foo. I guess I could understand why this is happening, but what's not clear to me is how I can get around it without having to make a copy of b with an extra slot at the beginning for aa (which I'd rather not do, as this code would be running quite often and with b being somewhat long).

So my question is: Am I just doing this wrong? And if not, what would be the most efficient way to do what I'm trying to do?

(Also, I can't change the signature of foo).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the Go runtime a variadic function is implemented as if it had an extra slice parameter at the end instead of a variadic parameter.

For example:

func Foo( a int, b ...int )
func FooImpl( a int, b []int )

c := 10
d := 20

//This call
Foo(5, c, d)

// is implemented like this
b := []int{c, d}
FooImpl(5, b)

In theory Go could handle the case where some of a variadic arguments are specified directly and the rest are expanded out of an array/slice. But, it would not be efficient.

//This call
Foo(5, c, b...)

// would be implemented like this.
v := append([]int{c},b...)
FooImpl(5, v)

You can see that Go would be creating a copy of b anyways. The ethos of Go is to be as small as possible and yet still useful. So small features like this get dropped. You may be able to argue for this syntactic sugar, as it can be implemented slightly more efficiently than straight forward approach of append.

Note that expanding an array with ... does not create a copy for use as the parameter. The parameter just aliases the variable. In other words it's really efficient.

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The variable b looks like a slice rather than an array. –  Eonil Oct 26 '13 at 7:04
    
Good catch. It's too easy to break the rule "Thou shalt not call a slice an array!" –  deft_code Oct 29 '13 at 0:20

You can do something like this:

package main

import "fmt"

func foo(a int, b ...int) {
    fmt.Println(a,b)
}

func main() {
    a := 0
    aa := 1
    b := []int{2,3,4}
    foo(a, append([]int{aa}, b...)...)
}

When expecting b ...int, you need to pass a []int... or int's as parameters. Don't can't mix int and []int...

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