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I have a tab control which has 3 tab pages. Below this tab control on same form/view, i have 3 images controls.

Based on SelectedIndex of tab, i need to change opacity of below 3 images.

As of now i have something like this in SelectionChanged event of Tab control:

switch (Tab.SelectedIndex)
{
     case 0:
         img1.Opacity= 1;
         img2.Opacity = 0.5;
         img3.Opacity  = 0.5;
         break;
     case 1:
         img1.Opacity = 0.5;
         img2.Opacity = 1;
         img3.Opacity  = 0.5;
         break;
     case 2:
         img1.Opacity = 0.5;
         img2.Opacity = 0.5;
         img3.Opacity = 1;
         break;
}

How do i remove this switch statement? Which design pattern shall i use here ?

share|improve this question
    
Why remove/replace the switch? What is not working? –  Henk Holterman Sep 22 '13 at 17:56
    
It is not unit testable. –  NoobDeveloper Sep 22 '13 at 17:56
2  
Yes it is. The event-driven surrounding might be a problem, but that requires a bigger fix. –  Henk Holterman Sep 22 '13 at 18:06

6 Answers 6

I think you can handle this in your xaml itself by using Triggers.

Also if you want to have this unit testable, you should use MVVM pattern where you will define properties for SelectedIndex, Opacities in your ViewModel and bind them to xaml

share|improve this answer
    
EDIT: That is exactly what i done. But purposely not posted it in my question. my question is still the same. How would i unit test my VM then ? –  NoobDeveloper Sep 22 '13 at 17:58
2  
if your are using MVVM then you can write test cases for your ViewModel's properties for opaciteis of images which will be changed when you change the selectedindex property –  nit Sep 22 '13 at 18:00

You can use the State design pattern explained for instace here. You will define few states and then by condition decide which of them should be used in the moment.

Example:

abstract class State
{
    abstract vod Apply(Form context);
}

class StateOne : State
{
    override void Apply(Form context)
    {
        img1.Opacity= 1;
        img2.Opacity = 0.5;
        img3.Opacity  = 0.5;
    }
}

You can also combine it with the Factory method design pattern that would decide which state to use.

static class StateFactory
{
    static State GetState(condition)
    {
        if(condition == something)
            return new StateOne();
        else ...
    }
}

This will not remove switch statements from your code, but it will at least be in a reasonable place doing reasonable thing.

Usage:

StateFactory.GetState(condition).Apply(this);
share|improve this answer
    
I am getting the idea. However, can you explain it a bit more ? So in SelectionChanged of tabcontrol, How would i know which State object i will need? –  NoobDeveloper Sep 22 '13 at 18:03
1  
@Nexus I do think you can actually get rid of if statements or swtich statements, but you can put them to a place where you will not see them to often, just when you need add a new state. I updated me code with a Factory method for you. –  Ondrej Janacek Sep 22 '13 at 18:06
    
+1, but I'd use a Dictionary<int, State> to hold and retrieve the state (e.g., _states[tab.SelectedIndex].Apply(this)) –  Will Sep 22 '13 at 19:56
    
@Will Yeah, it is possible. Using switch or ifs for simple situations like this is ok. I always use a dictionary when I don't want to create a state multiple times. I create it once and then store it in a dictionary. –  Ondrej Janacek Sep 23 '13 at 10:46

Extract and inject. Extract view changing logic (switch) to external class/method and inject it to your view:

public void HighlightImages(int selection, params Image[] images)
{
    switch (selection)
    {
        case 0:
            images[0].Opacity= 1;
            images[1].Opacity = 0.5;
            images[2].Opacity  = 0.5;
            break;
        case 1:
            images[0].Opacity = 0.5;
            images[1].Opacity = 1;
            images[2].Opacity  = 0.5;
            break;
        case 2:
            images[0].Opacity = 0.5;
            images[1].Opacity = 0.5;
            images[2].Opacity = 1;
            break;
    }
}

In selection changed handler you simply delegate handling to injected dependency:

private void SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    this.highlighter.HighlightImages(Tab.SelectedIndex, img1, img2, img3);
}

This way you should be able to test opacity-changing logic easily without the need to instantiate full-blown view control.

share|improve this answer

If you have a bunch of arbitrary data that you need to pass in... Then there really isn't a way to get around switch statements easily (that's worth the effort, at least). I would suggest, at least in terms of code readability, to use an enum. You could refactor your code like this:

    switch ((ImageTypes)Tab.SelectedIndex)
    {
        case ImageTypes.TypeOne:
            img1.Opacity= 1;
            img2.Opacity = 0.5;
            img3.Opacity  = 0.5;
            break;
        case ImageTypes.TypeTwo:
            img1.Opacity = 0.5;
            img2.Opacity = 1;
            img3.Opacity  = 0.5;
            break;
        case ImageTypes.TypeThree:
            img1.Opacity = 0.5;
            img2.Opacity = 0.5;
            img3.Opacity = 1;
            break;
    }
    public enum ImageTypes
    {
        TypeOne,
        TypeTwo,
        TypeThree
    }
share|improve this answer

This will not completely remove it, as there's not much to be done other than creating a big class heritage, but that would be a little overkill for this situation.

Instead, you can reduce its size like this :

switch (Tab.SelectedIndex)
{
     img1.Opacity = 0.5;
     img2.Opacity = 0.5;
     img3.Opacity = 0.5;

     case 0:
         img1.Opacity += 0.5;
         break;
     case 1:
         img2.Opacity += 0.5;
         break;
     case 2:
         img3.Opacity += 0.5;
         break;
}

And you can reduce code redundancy with methods, so you don't have to change 0.5 everywhere each time you want to change the opacity. (Putting the 0.5 in a constant would be nice too) :

switch (Tab.SelectedIndex)
{
     SetInitialOpacity(img1);
     SetInitialOpacity(img2);
     SetInitialOpacity(img3);

     case 0:
         IncreaseOpacity(img1);
         break;
     case 1:
         IncreaseOpacity(img2);
         break;
     case 2:
         IncreaseOpacity(img3);
         break;
}

private void SetInitialOpacity(Image image)
{
    image.Opacity = 0.5;
}


private void IncreaseOpacity(Image image)
{
    image.Opacity += 0.5;
}
share|improve this answer

Referring to what "jimmy-keen" said, this is what I would go for:

    public static void HighlightImages(int selection, params Image[] images)
    {
        for (int img = 0; img < images.Length; img++)
        {
            images[img].Opacity = (img == selection ? 1 : 0.5);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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