Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a question which is probably in 2 parts:

I am using a (nominally 32 bit) integer variable which I would like to write to an 8 bit UART as 4 bytes (i.e., as binary data)

i.e. variable Count : integer range 0 to 2147483647;

How should I chop the 32 bit integer variable into 4 separate 8 bit std_logic_vectors as expected by my UART code, and how should I pass these to the UART one byte at a time ?

I am aware std_logic_vector(to_unsigned(Count, 32)) will convert the integer variable into a 32 bit std_logic_vector, but then what ? Should I create a 32 bit std_logic_vector, assign the converted Count value to it, then subdivide it using something like the following code ? I realise the following assumes the count variable does not change during the 4 clock cycles, and assumes the UART can accept a new byte every clock cycle, and lacks any means of re-triggering the 4 byte transmit cycle, but am I on the right track here, or is there a better way ?

variable CountOut  : std_logic_vector(31 downto 0);

process (clock)

   variable Index : integer range 0 to 4 := 0;

   begin

   if rising_edge(clock) then

      CountOut <= std_logic_vector(to_unsigned(Count, 32);

      if (Index = 0) then
         UartData(7 downto 0) <= CountOut(31 downto 24);
         Index := 1;
      elsif (Index = 1) then
         UartData(7 downto 0) <= CountOut(23 downto 16);
         Index := 2;
      elsif (Index = 2) then
         UartData(7 downto 0) <= CountOut(15 downto 8);
         Index := 3;
      elsif (Index =31) then
         UartData(7 downto 0) <= CountOut(7 downto 0);
         Index := 4;
      else
         Index := Index;
      end if;

   end if;

end process;

Any comments or recommendations would be appreciated.

Thanks,

MAI-AU.

share|improve this question

You seem to be on the right track. I believe there are two basic solutions to this problem:

  1. Register the output value as a 32-bit vector, and use different ranges for each output operation (as you did in your code example)
  2. Register the output value as a 32-bit vector, and shift this value 8 bits at a time after each output operation. This way you can use the same range in all operations. The code below should give you an idea:
process (clock)
   variable Index: integer range 0 to 4 := 0;
begin
   if rising_edge(clock) then      
      if (Index = 0) then
         CountOut <= std_logic_vector(to_unsigned(Count, 32));
         Index := Index + 1;
      elsif (Index < 4) then
         UartData <= CountOut(31 downto 24);
         CountOut <= CountOut sll 8;
         Index := Index + 1;
      end if;
   end if;
end process;

Also, please check your assignments, in your example CountOut is declared as a variable but is assigned to as a signal.

share|improve this answer

There's nothing wrong with the code you've shown. You can do something to separate the the assignment to UartData using Index to allow a loop.

library ieee;
use ieee.std_logic_1164.all;

entity union is
end entity;

architecture foo of union is
    type union32 is array (integer range 1 to 4) of std_logic_vector(7 downto 0);
    signal UartData:    std_logic_vector(7 downto 0);
begin

TEST:
    process 
    variable quad:    union32;
    constant fourbytes:    std_logic_vector(31 downto 0) := X"deadbeef";
    begin

        quad := union32'(fourbytes(31 downto 24), fourbytes(23 downto 16),
                         fourbytes(15 downto 8),fourbytes(7 downto 0));

        for i in union32'RANGE loop
            wait for 9.6 us;
            UartData <= Quad(i);
        end loop; 

        wait for 9.6 us;  -- to display the last byte
        wait;  -- one ping only
    end process;
end architecture; 

Bytes accessed by index

Or use a type conversion function to hide complexity:

library ieee;
use ieee.std_logic_1164.all;

entity union is
    type union32 is array (integer range 1 to 4) of std_logic_vector(7 downto 0);
end entity;

architecture fee of union is

    signal UartData:    std_logic_vector(7 downto 0);

    function toquad (inp: std_logic_vector(31 downto 0)) return union32 is
    begin
        return union32'(inp(31 downto 24), inp(23 downto 16),
                        inp(15 downto 8),  inp( 7 downto 0));
    end function;
begin

TEST:
    process 
    variable quad:    union32;
    constant fourbytes:    std_logic_vector(31 downto 0) := X"deadbeef";
    begin

        quad := toquad (fourbytes);

        for i in union32'RANGE loop
            wait for 9.6 us;
            UartData <= Quad(i);
        end loop; 

        wait for 9.6 us;  -- to display the last byte
        wait;  -- one ping only
    end process;
end architecture;

And gives the same answer.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.