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For each of the following write the equivalent C++ expressions, without any unary negation operators (!). (!= is still permitted)

Use DeMorgan's law

  • !( P && Q) = !P || !Q
  • !( P || Q) = !P && !Q

For

  1. !(x!=5 && x!=7)
  2. !(x<5 || x>=7)
  3. !( !(a>3 && b>4) && (c != 5))

My answers:

  1. (x>5 || x<5) || (x>7 || x<7)
  2. x>=5 && x < 7
  3. (a>3 && b > 4) && (c!=5)

Are these correct? If not, can you give me answers and explain why they are wrong?

I am a beginner in C++ so take it easy.

share|improve this question
    
how did you new > and < opperators from demorgan's for 1? – jodag Sep 22 '13 at 22:27
    
Since I cant use ! (!= is permitted though), I had to use < and >. – jshm415 Sep 22 '13 at 22:32
    
I thought that the opposite of #1 is x is greater than or less than 5 or x is greater than 7 or less than 7. – jshm415 Sep 22 '13 at 22:34
    
Why not write some code and test your assumptions. – Loki Astari Sep 22 '13 at 22:46
    
The opposite of x!=5 is x==5 for #1 you first apply Demorgan's first rule !(x!=5 && x!=7) -> !(x!=5) || !(x!=7) Then you know that !(x!=5) -> x==5 and !(x!=7) -> x==7 so you are left with !(x!=5 && x!=7) -> x==5 || x==7 – jodag Sep 22 '13 at 22:48

Check this out:

!(x!=5 && x!=7)                 -->    x==5 || x==7

!(x<5 || x>=7)                  -->    x>=5 && x<7

!( !(a>3 && b>4) && (c != 5))   -->    (a>3 && b>4) || c==5

So, just #2 from your solutions is correct.

share|improve this answer
    
Why did you use "==" instead? I thought "==" was used only for equality-testing. Isn't "!=" meant "not equal to"? Thank you for your answer. – jshm415 Sep 22 '13 at 22:40
    
!(x != y) => (x == y) – Loki Astari Sep 22 '13 at 22:54

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