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I am making an IRC bot with C++ and the Qt Library for C++. I have looked around, but could not find an algorithm I liked for binary to decimal conversion. My decimal to binary does not work at all, but my bin to dec returns an answer, shifted to the lift 2 bits. Here is my code:

QString MainWindow::toBin(bool isneg, QString num) {
QString buffer;
bool boolBuffer;
int intBuffer;
int bitNum;
if(isneg) {
    boolBuffer = true;
    intBuffer = 0;
    QString out;
    while(boolBuffer) {
        if(pow(2, (double)intBuffer) >= num.toDouble()) {
            boolBuffer = false;
        } else {
            intBuffer++;
        }
    }

    bitNum = intBuffer;
    intBuffer = num.toInt();
    buffer = "1";
    intBuffer = intBuffer - pow(2, bitNum);
    bitNum--;
    for(int i=bitNum;i>=0;i--) {
        if(intBuffer - pow(2, i) >= 0) {
            intBuffer = intBuffer - pow(2, i);
            buffer.append("1");
        } else {
            buffer.append("0");
        }
    }

    for(int i=0;i<buffer.length();i++) {
        if(buffer.at(i)=='1') out.append("0");
        else out.append("1");
    }

    out.append(" + 1");
    return out;
} else {
   boolBuffer = true;
   intBuffer = 0;
   while(boolBuffer) {
       if(pow(2, (double)intBuffer) >= num.toDouble()) {
           boolBuffer = false;
       } else {
           intBuffer++;
       }
   }

   bitNum = intBuffer;
   intBuffer = num.toInt();
   buffer = "1";
   intBuffer = intBuffer - pow(2, bitNum);
   bitNum--;
   for(int i=bitNum;i>=0;i--) {
       if(intBuffer - pow(2, i) >= 0) {
           intBuffer = intBuffer - pow(2, i);
           buffer.append("1");
       } else {
           buffer.append("0");
       }
   }

   return buffer;
}
}

QString MainWindow::toDec(bool isneg, QString num) {
QString buffer;
int intBuffer;
if(isneg) {
    buffer = num;
    intBuffer = 0;
    for(int i=0;i<buffer.length();i++) {
        if(buffer.at(i)=='1') intBuffer = intBuffer + pow(2, abs(buffer.length()-i-1));
    }
    buffer = QString::number(-1*intBuffer);

    return buffer;
} else {
    buffer = num;
    intBuffer = 0;
    for(int i=0;i<buffer.length();i++) {
        if(buffer.at(i)=='1') intBuffer = intBuffer + pow(2, abs(buffer.length()-i-1));
    }
    buffer = QString::number(intBuffer);
    ui->textBrowser->append(buffer);
    return buffer;
}
}

Everything else works fine, I have tested it and it is called, the sending of the message is fine, and I have gone through and manually inputed the QString "10", then ran through the code in my head while writing down vars in a document, and I came to the conclusion 2, but when I call the function it returns 8.

share|improve this question
2  
do you want me to debug it? –  akonsu Sep 22 '13 at 23:12
    
It's ironic that this is what you came up with after deciding that you don't like any of the more efficient and legible algorithms out there. –  paddy Sep 22 '13 at 23:18
    
even more ironic: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/245410bf9a313fe5 program prints 10 and 2 on my box. That would be "correct" (lots of other things are clearly not correct here) –  sehe Sep 22 '13 at 23:24
    
@sehe I suspect that might be due to extra characters in the string (like CR/LF, perhaps). I have amended my answer to stop processing at the first invalid character. –  paddy Sep 22 '13 at 23:33

1 Answer 1

You can approach this differently. Instead of trying to compute the bit value at each string position, just double your number every time you get a new digit. This is what is done by most algorithms out there (you know, the ones you didn't like):

QString MainWindow::toDec(bool isneg, QString num) {
    int val = 0;

    for( int i = 0; i < num.length(); i++ ) {
        val = (val << 1) + num.at(i).digitValue();
    }

    return QString::number( isneg ? -val: val);
}

I'm not sure about your "negative" representation though. Binary negatives are usually in two's-complement form. This decimal conversion will not work for that.


[edit] You know, I just had a thought that your input is not sensible. Both your algorithm and my simplification rely on the string containing only 0 or 1 characters. But I'd be willing to bet you have other characters in that string.

The fix for this would demand a modification of the loop:

for( int i = 0; i < num.length(); i++ )
{
   int bit = num.at(i).digitValue();
   if( bit != 0 && bit != 1 ) break;
   val = (val << 1) + bit;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that almost worked. I figured out that I could do the neg by switching all the symbols around like I did before, then adding / subtracting 1 at the return. Also, the - '0' did not work, I had to use int bit = QString(num.at(i)).toInt(); Thanks, know to figure out the decimal to binary! –  Aft-pan Sep 23 '13 at 1:49
    
Oh, yeah I haven't used Qt in years. Sorry about that. Instead of those string conversions, just use the routine from QChar -- bit = num.at(i).digitValue();. This is more efficient. –  paddy Sep 23 '13 at 1:53

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