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I am looking to convert existing code in C to perform the following: I am attempting to write a hex dump program that prints out address: values printable characters. Currently, the code for values is printing in the following format:

0003540: 05 04 06 75 6e 73 69 67 6e 65 64 20 63 68 61 72 ...unsigned char

Desired hex output:

0003540: 0504 0675 6e73 6967 6e65 6420 6368 6172 ...unsigned char

Current code printing in pairs:

addr = 0;
  while ( ( cnt = ( long )
    fread ( buf, sizeof ( unsigned char ), 16, filein ) ) > 0 ) {

    b = buf;
    /* Print the address in hexadecimal. */
    fprintf ( fileout, "%07lx  ", addr );
    addr = addr + 16;
    /* Print 16 data items, in pairs, in hexadecimal. */
    cnt2 = 0;
    for ( m = 0; m < 16; m++ ) {
      cnt2 = cnt2 + 1;
      if ( cnt2 <= cnt ) {
        fprintf ( fileout, "%02x", *b++ );
      }
      else {
        fprintf ( fileout, "  " );
      }
      fprintf ( fileout, " " );
    }
    /* Print the printable characters, or a period if unprintable. */
    fprintf ( fileout, " " );
    cnt2 = 0;
    for ( n = 0; n < 16; n++ ) {
      cnt2 = cnt2 + 1;
      if ( cnt2 <= cnt ) {
        if ( ( buf[n] < 32 ) || ( buf[n] > 126 ) ) {
          fprintf ( fileout, "%c", '.' );
        }
        else {
          fprintf ( fileout, "%c", buf[n] );
        }
      }
    }
    fprintf( fileout, "\n" );
  }

How can I alter this code to achieve the AB12 CD34 format? Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Can't you just use fprintf(fileout, "%02x%02x ", *b++, *b++) or similar? I'm not sure with your variable names... – Tawnos Sep 23 '13 at 1:23
    
Hi Tawnos, the full code which would explain the variables more clearly can be found here link – simplicity Sep 23 '13 at 1:27
2  
@Tawnos Isn't that unspecified behavior? – Yu Hao Sep 23 '13 at 1:47
1  
@YuHao: yes, it is unspecified behaviour. fprintf(fileout, "%02x%02x", b[0], b[1]); b += 2; would work accurately, though. The pairs of hex digits encoding runs into questions of endian-ness. Or, at least, the data will be presented in byte order unambiguously, but if the pair of characters were treated as a short, the order for what is printed as 0x1234 in this code might be stored as 0x1234 (no problem) or as 0x3412. It isn't wrong, but personally I prefer the current layout over the proposed one. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 23 '13 at 2:13
1  
@Tawnos that would work if there was always both bytes available to print each time, however in the case that we only have 1 byte left wouldn't it error attempting to print the second byte as well? This is where Boann's answer would catch the corner case. – simplicity Sep 23 '13 at 2:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use the modulo (remainder) operator % to test if m is divisible by 2. Only write the space when it is:

for ( m = 0; m < 16; m++ ) {
  if ( m > 0 && m % 2 == 0 ) {
    fprintf ( fileout, " " );
  }
  fprintf ( fileout, "%02x", *b++ );
}

Edit 3:

for ( m = 0; m < 16; m++ ) {
  if ( m > 0 && m % 2 == 0 ) {
    fprintf ( fileout, " " ); // space between every second byte
  }
  if ( m < cnt ) {
    fprintf ( fileout, "%02x", *b++ );
  } else {
    fprintf ( fileout, "  " ); // blank if run out of bytes on this line
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Boann, but would you be able to clarify where this would fit into the previous code, or if it would replace it completely? The if ( cnt2 <= cnt ) is used to make sure that values are only printed up to the size of the characters to be hex dumped (signified by cnt). Therefore, could you clarify how to integrate keeping the if ( cnt2 <= cnt ) check while still printing 2 pairs at a time? Thanks! – simplicity Sep 23 '13 at 1:33
    
@simplicity I'm not sure I follow. Do you only want 16 bytes, or do you want cnt bytes, or whichever is the less, or do you want cnt bytes but 16 per line? – Boann Sep 23 '13 at 1:38
    
it would be up to whichever is the less, with a max of the 16 per line. – simplicity Sep 23 '13 at 1:41
    
@simplicity Does my edit do what you need? – Boann Sep 23 '13 at 1:43
    
I have added the full context of the variables to the description of the problem. I believe this should be what I need but if possible I would request you look at the code within the context of the entire problem posted, as it may be easier to see what I am intending to do rather than my typed out explanations. Thanks! – simplicity Sep 23 '13 at 1:48

I think this can be simplified quite a bit. For example, I'd consider starting with something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main(){
    char buffer[17];
    size_t bytes;
    int i;
    while (0 < (bytes = fread(buffer, 1, 16, stdin))) {
        for (i = 0; i < bytes / 2; i++) // print out bytes, 2 at a time
            printf("%02x%02x ", buffer[i * 2], buffer[i * 2 + 1]);
        if (i * 2 < bytes)              // take care of (possible) odd byte
            printf("%02x   ", buffer[i * 2]);

        for (; i < 8; i++)              // right pad hex bytes
            printf("     ");

        for (i = 0; i < bytes; i++)     // change unprintable to '.'
            if (!isprint(buffer[i]))
                buffer[i] = '.';

        buffer[i] = '\0';               // terminate string
        printf("\t%s\n", buffer);   // print out characters
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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