Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I'm not sure why this doesn't make sense to me, I'm not clear on how git revert works. For example I want to revert to a commit 6 commits behind the head, reverting all the changes in the intermediary commits in between.

Say its SHA hash is 56e05fced214c44a37759efa2dfc25a65d8ae98d. Then why can't I just do something like:

git revert 56e05fced214c44a37759efa2dfc25a65d8ae98d

?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by rene, TGMCians, T.C., Sean Vieira, Ganesh Sittampalam Jun 28 at 19:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Even though this question is actually older than the one it's now marked as a duplicate of, that one has a better answer. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/147643/… –  Ganesh Sittampalam Jun 28 at 19:39
add comment

10 Answers

up vote 608 down vote accepted

If you want to commit on top of the current HEAD with the exact state at a different commit, undoing all the intermediate commits, then you can use reset to create the correct state of the index to make the commit.

# Reset the index to the desired tree
git reset 56e05fced

# Move the branch pointer back to the previous HEAD
git reset --soft HEAD@{1}

git commit -m "Revert to 56e05fced"

# Update working copy to reflect the new commit
git reset --hard
share|improve this answer
55  
Wouldn't it be equivalent (and one command shorter) to do: git reset --hard 56e05fced as the first command, and then skip the final git reset --hard? –  Mark Longair Mar 2 '12 at 8:20
13  
When I did this I ended up with a bunch of Untracked Files in the working tree. However looking at the history I could see that those files did have a corresponding delete commit in that "Revert to SHA" commit. So after git reset --hard at the end, you can do git clean -f -d to clean up any untracked files that lingered about. Also, thank you so much this helped me solve a crisis! –  nzifnab Apr 27 '12 at 19:33
    
do I have to do the git reset --soft HEAD@{1} unconditionally? I mean always with a value of 1? –  vemv Sep 17 '13 at 9:23
3  
@vemv Yes, unless you want to throw away commits on the tip of the branch. git reset 56e05fced adds another entry to the reflog (run git reflog), so git reset --soft HEAD@{1} simply moves the pointer back to the HEAD prior to calling git reset 56e05fced. Using a higher number (e.g. git reset --soft HEAD@{2}) would append the new commit on a previous commit. That is, increasing the number would essentially throw away N-1 commits where N is the number you replace 1 with. –  bfrohs Sep 18 '13 at 18:37
    
git reset --soft HEAD@{1} seemed to be an invalid command. My branches have now diverged. This screwed me up badly. –  Tom Jun 2 at 20:27
show 1 more comment

It reverts the said commit, that is adds commit opposite to it. If you want to checkout earlier revision you do the

git checkout 56e05fced214c44a37759efa2dfc25a65d8ae98d
share|improve this answer
    
then I can just merge this with the head? What if I anticipate having TONS of conflicts, can I just force this commit to be the head "as-is" and just overwrite any conflicts? –  Joseph Silvashy Dec 12 '09 at 23:43
1  
I'm not sure what head you're talking about. You can just move your head back to this commit. (for instance by deleting and creating branch). If you want to do a "merge" commit into the head, which is effectively the reversal of the intermediate commits, you can use merge with "ours" strategy. Pick your option and read manpages. The power is waiting for you to use it ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 12 '09 at 23:48
    
That makes sense, the reason I ask is that git now tells me that I'm not on any branch. –  Joseph Silvashy Dec 12 '09 at 23:51
7  
because you aren't. if you type git branch you will clearly see it. You can do for instance git checkout -b mybranch 56e05 to get it with branch. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 13 '09 at 0:06
    
I think he's asking how to do a fastforward –  Thufir Dec 23 '13 at 20:37
add comment

What git-revert does is create a commit which undoes changes made in given commit, creating a commit which is reverse (well, reciprocal) of a given commit. Therefore

git revert <SHA-1>

should and does work.

If you want to rewind back to specified commit, and you can do this because this part of history was not yet published, what you need to use is git-reset, not git-revert:

git reset --hard <SHA-1>

(note that --hard would make you lose any non-comitted changes in the working directory).

Additional Notes

By the way, perhaps it is not obvious, but everywhere where documentation says <commit> or <commit-ish> (or <object>) you can put SHA-1 identifier (full or shortened) of commit.

share|improve this answer
    
In the case that you're history has already been pushed to a remote before you did the hard reset, you would need to force push the newly reset branch with git push -f, but Be Warned that this could possibly unintentionally delete other users' commits, and if not delete new commits, then it will force other users to resynchronize their work with the reset branch, so make sure this is OK with your collaborators first. –  Cupcake Jun 28 at 17:25
add comment

Best way to rollback to specific commit is

git reset --hard <commit-id>

then

git push <reponame> -f
share|improve this answer
6  
Novices should be aware that push -f can destroy history. However, sometimes this is what you want :) –  Jared Beck Feb 26 '13 at 0:30
1  
Sometimes you are really glad that the history is deleted...was looking for this -f option, thks ! –  Antoine Mar 26 '13 at 4:54
    
Thanks, to be literal, I had to type in -> git push origin master -f where <reponame> can't just be origin at least for me –  SWoo Aug 15 '13 at 3:10
    
As people have mentioned above, If we want our repo head pointing to a specific commit without maintaining history then use above steps other wise we can use git revert. –  minhas23 May 26 at 7:48
add comment

If your changes have already been pushed to a public, shared remote, and you want to revert all commits between HEAD and <sha-id>, then you can pass a commit range to git revert,

git revert 56e05f..HEAD

and it will revert all commits between 56e05f and HEAD (excluding the start point of the range, 56e05f).

share|improve this answer
8  
This feels the safest to me, although it might be better to do git revert HEAD..56e05f so that the commits are reverted in reverse order, avoiding potential conflicts –  thelem Mar 8 '13 at 12:46
    
Note that if you're reverting a few hundred commits, this could take a while because you have to commit each revert individually. –  splicer Jun 27 '13 at 6:14
    
@splicer you don't have to revert each commit individually, you can either pass the --no-edit option to avoid having to make individual commit messages, or you can use --no-commit to commit the reversions all at once. –  Cupcake Jun 28 at 17:40
    
@thelem git revert HEAD..56e05f is entirely the wrong command to use, git revert 56e05f..HEAD already reverts the commits in reverse order to avoid conflicts. –  Cupcake Jun 28 at 17:42
add comment

This is what I do:

# Create a backup of master branch
git branch backup_master

# Point master to '56e05fce' and
# make working directory the same with '56e05fce'
git reset --hard 56e05fce

# Point master back to 'backup_master' and
# leave working directory the same with '56e05fce'.
git reset --soft backup_master

# Now working directory is the same '56e05fce' and
# master points to the original revision. Then we create a commit.
git commit -a -m "Revert to 56e05fce"

# Delete unused brand
git branch -d backup_master

The 2 commands git reset --hard and git reset --soft are a magic here. The first one changes working dir but it also changes head too. We fix the head by the second one.

share|improve this answer
    
The -a in your commit isn't necessary. –  splicer Jun 27 '13 at 6:21
add comment

This is more understandable:

git checkout 56e05fced -- .
git add .
git commit -m 'Revert to 56e05fced'

And to prove that it worked:

git diff 56e05fced
share|improve this answer
6  
This isn't correct in general, I'm afraid. The checkout will only (I think) update paths that exist, so if a file has been deleted since 56e05fced, it won't be staged by doing git checkout 56e05fced -- . –  Mark Longair Mar 2 '12 at 8:11
    
This solution won't delete new files that have been added since 56e05fced , like a git reset --hard or a git revert would. You really want to use those commands if you actually want to restore the state of 56e05fced, not git checkout. –  Cupcake Jun 28 at 17:22
add comment

Should be as simple as:

git reset --hard 56e05f

That'll get you back to that specific point in time.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This might work:

git checkout 56e05f
echo ref: refs/heads/master > .git/HEAD
git commit
share|improve this answer
    
This basically does the same thing as git reset --hard 56e05f, except this is less safe and more hacky. You might as well use Charle's solution or Jakub's solution. –  Cupcake Jun 28 at 17:14
add comment

This results in the same thing as the accepted answer:

git reset --hard 56e05fced
git commit --amend -m "Revert to 56e05fced"
share|improve this answer
    
There is no reason to amend the commit message after a hard reset, and in fact shouldn't be done, it's unnecessary. You would only want a message of "Revert to 56e05fced" if you added a new commit, not hard reset to a previous one. You might force yourself to have to force push now if the remote was on commit 56e05fced, but you've now rewritten it with the amend. –  Cupcake Jun 28 at 17:17
    
Can you explain how the accepted answer differs from mine in the final result? –  Kacy Raye Jun 28 at 18:20
    
The difference, as I've already mentioned, is that the accepted answer creates a new commit, while yours hard resets to a previous one (which throws away all of the commits after it, instead of creating a new commit), and then on top of that, it also rewrites the commit that you wanted to restore, which means you now might have to force push it to a remote. –  Cupcake Jun 28 at 18:29
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.