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I am processing couple of GB of text, and my script dies on preg_replace(). After some research I extract the problematic part of the text, where the leak appears.

preg_replace('/\b\p{L}{0,2}\b/u', '', "\x65\xe2\xba\xb7\x69\xe3\xb1\xae"); 

PHP Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 134217728 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 251105872 bytes)

I am trying to delete short (up to 2 chars) words. Also I found out, if I change regexp to:

preg_replace('/\b\p{L}{1,2}\b/u', '', "\x65\xe2\xba\xb7\x69\xe3\xb1\xae"); 

it works just OK.

Somebody can explain whats going on please? 1st example works on 99% texts.

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Are you passing the entire "couple gigs of text" to the function at once? Meaning you've first read the entire file into memory? –  jedwards Sep 23 '13 at 4:41
    
^^process in chunks –  Dagon Sep 23 '13 at 4:43
    
Nope. I got text files, each is around 100 kb –  2ge Sep 23 '13 at 5:15
1  
Why would you want to replace zero letters with nothing? This looks to me like a "Doctor, it hurts when I do this" kind of question. :D –  Alan Moore Sep 23 '13 at 5:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
\b\p{L}{0,2}\b
        ^

This 0 here will make the regex match in more places than you need and you get possibly twice or more to match and replace.

E.g: You get 344 matches with a "Lorem ipsum" text with \b\p{L}{0,2}\b (regex101 demo) but only 19 with \b\p{L}{1,2}\b (regex101 demo).

And if it's a replace, you get so many more to do!

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sure, I understand that. But what I don't understand, how it is possible PHP doesn't have enough memory on 8 characters long string. 'PHP Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 134217728 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 251105872 bytes)' –  2ge Sep 23 '13 at 6:54
    
@2ge Well, I guess it's because \p{L} contains lots and lots of characters and it's checking for each character 1 more time at each matching position, which turns into millions of more 'checks'. –  Jerry Sep 23 '13 at 7:21

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