Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

This question already has an answer here:

I have this C program in which it should be given arguments like the following:

./program -i inputFile -o outputFile

and here's my related section of code

  while ((c = getopt(argc, argv, "i:o:")) != -1) {
            switch (c) {


                 case 'i':
                          inFile = strdup(optarg);
                 break;
                 case 'o':
                          outFile = strdup(optarg);
                 break;
                 default:

                          error_usage(argv[0]);

                      }
                }

also here's the error_usage function:

void error_usage(char *prog)
      {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s  -i inputfile -o outputfile\n", prog);
        exit(1);
      }

How should I modify my case statement in a way that if I run my program like the following: ./program it gives me the following error? Usage: prog -i inputfile -o outputfile

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by John3136, P0W, RAS, MSalters, nijansen Sep 23 '13 at 7:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

Before you call getopt, check argc

if ( argc == 1 )
{
  fprintf(stderr, "... ");
  return -1;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
And what if only one of the options was missing? –  john Sep 23 '13 at 5:10
    
you can check argc, if argc == 1 when there are no arguments, or argc == 2 if there is only one argument. –  CyberSpock Sep 23 '13 at 5:12
1  
And what if the user repeated the -i argument? Then there would be the correct number of arguments, but the usage would still be wrong. –  john Sep 23 '13 at 5:13
1  
then he would need to analyze the results after getopt, but that was not the question. –  CyberSpock Sep 23 '13 at 5:14
1  
@MonaJalal you would need to copy argv[0] into a buffer and then remove the path. –  CyberSpock Sep 23 '13 at 5:52

See inFile and outFile to NULL

Then after your getopts loop check to see if either is still NULL. If they are then print the usage message and exit

if (inFile == NULL || outFile == NULL)
    error_usage(argv[0]);
share|improve this answer
    
Simply getopt can do the job –  P0W Sep 23 '13 at 5:12
    
@P0W Then you should supply an answer –  john Sep 23 '13 at 5:18

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.