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I have seen many piece of code in many standard books where my is being used in loops like below.

TYPE 1-

foreach my $mykey ( keys %myhash) {
......
}

or

while(my $line = <$filehandle> ) {
.....
}

Here we are declaring variable for each key of the hash or for each line.Is it a good idea?

In C/C++/Java we used to declare the variable first then we use it. So if I follow that policy then above code should be as below.

TYPE 2-

my $mykey;
foreach $mykey (keys %myhash) {
....
}

or

my $line;
while($line = <$filehandle> ) {
....
}

It will speedup the code execution( I think) because as per context we decide what type of operation can be applied on variable and what will be its behavior.

But I have seen TYPE 1 code mostly in Perl. So I think I am missing some perl concept. Someone please throw light on it.

If you are going to say that it is declared/associated to scope once and then incremented only then please provide some documentation. I could not get it anywhere. I understand that scope of the variable will be different in both the cases.

@http://perldoc.perl.org/perlsub.html#Private-Variables-via-my%28%29-- The my operator declares the listed variables to be lexically confined to the enclosing block, conditional (if/unless/elsif/else), loop (for/foreach/while/until/continue), subroutine, eval, or do/require/use'd file.

will variable association using my will be done in each step?

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2  
for (int i=... is quite common in C and C++ too. –  Mat Sep 23 '13 at 5:51
    
yes it is. But initialization happens only once. –  virus Sep 23 '13 at 5:53
1  
Only one variable is created and its value is overwritten with each loop iteration. Perl is clever enough to figure that out –  knittl Sep 23 '13 at 5:53
    
Hye knittl -- how perl does this? Yes I have also assumed the same. But can you please provide some documentation for the same.I could not find any :( –  virus Sep 23 '13 at 5:55
1  
@virus: In your post you write that you had the opposite assumption. –  knittl Sep 23 '13 at 5:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is a benchmark:

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings;
use Benchmark qw(:all);

my @list = ('abc')x1_000_000;

my $count = -2;
cmpthese($count, {
    'inside' => sub {
        for my $elem(@list) { $elem = '' }
    },
    'outside' => sub {
        my $elem;
        for $elem(@list) { $elem = '' }
    },
});

Result:

          Rate outside  inside
outside 14.3/s      --      0%
inside  14.3/s      0%      --

As you can see, there're no differences in term of speed.

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First of all, the biggest difference between

while(my $line = <$filehandle> ) {
.....
}

and

my $line 
while($line = <$filehandle> ) {
.....
}

lies in scope, much more than optimisation for speed or execution time.

In the first case, $line is only visible in the while loop. After that, it goes out of scope, you get your memory back, and you have less chance for mistakes (by using a $line later and not getting an error.

Source: see this perldoc about for loops.

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I want to know something different. I have added last paragraph to my question to avoid different discussion –  virus Sep 23 '13 at 6:05

Saying:

foreach my $mykey ( keys %myhash) {
  ...
}

or

while(my $line = <$filehandle> ) {
  ...
}

confines the scope of variables $mykey and $line to the foreach and while loops respectively.

You might also want to say use strict 'vars'.

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I want to know something different. I have added last paragraph to my question to avoid different discussion. –  virus Sep 23 '13 at 6:04
    
@virus You seem to be looking for this. –  devnull Sep 23 '13 at 6:13
    
@perldoc.perl.org/perlsub.html#Private-Variables-via-my%28%29-- The my operator declares the listed variables to be lexically confined to the enclosing block, conditional (if/unless/elsif/else), loop (for/foreach/while/until/continue), subroutine, eval, or do/require/use'd file. will variable association using my will be done in each step? –  virus Sep 23 '13 at 6:42
    
@virus will variable association using my will be done in each step? No. It only affects the scope. Within the scope, the value would change and would be visible. That's it. –  devnull Sep 23 '13 at 7:01

In addition to what others have said about scope, if you don't use a lexical loop iterator in a for loop you may encounter code like:

my $i;
for $i (1..10) {
    last if check_something($i);
}
print $i;

This looks like it will print some value between 1 and 10, depending on the logic in check_something. In fact, it will always print undef because it is interpreted more like:

my $i;
{
    local $i;
    for $i (1..10) {
        last if check_something($i);
    }
}
print $i;

More detail in the Perl::Critic RequireLexicalLoopIterators policy.

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I don't think that the speed can be a issue in both approaches as it will be minimal(if its not run a million times, even that will be not much).

Type 1, will always clear the variable everytime loop is run.

Type 2, it wont happen everytime at runtime.

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