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I have two distinct problems, but they're posted together because I believe the solutions are related. I'm testing Newton's and secant methods (each of which is implemented with a loop) and plotting the results versus computing time on the same axes to compare them. I want the (discrete) Newton's method results to be connected by a blue line and the secant method results by a red line. These lines, in turn, are annotated by a corresponding legend. This is not happening because each and every point on the plot seems to be considered at individual object because they were individually created. And the legend command brings up two blue asterisks instead a blue one and a red one (I wish I could post my plot here, but I don't have the image privilege yet.)

Here's my abbreviated code:

f = (x) % define function
figure
hold on

%% Newton
tic
while % terminating condition
    % [Newtons method]

    t = toc;
    plot(t,log(abs(f(z)),'b*-')
end

%% Secant
tic
while % terminating condition
    % [secant method]

    t = toc;
    plot(t,log(abs(f(z)),'r*-')
end

legend('Newton''s','Secant')

Needless to day, the '-' in the linespec doesn't do anything because only a point is being plotted, not a line. I know I could make a line plot with each iteration with something like plot([t_old t],[log(abs(f(z_old) log(abs(f(z)]), but that isn't ideal, not least because log(abs(f(z_old))) would have to be reevaluated each time. Besides, that would not solve the problem with the legend.

I think both problems will be solved if I can get MATLAB to understand that I'm trying to create just two objects on the axes, one blue line and one red line. Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of What should I do to not show the legend for all the plots? –  thewaywewalk Sep 23 '13 at 7:35
    
@thewaywewalk Not a duplicate, although Bas Swinckels's solution, broadly defined, is similar to the answers in the other thread. grantnz's solution, on the other hand, is different, and it is what I was looking for. –  bongbang Sep 23 '13 at 13:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't want to store the x/y data in a vector and then replot the entire vector you could just add to the plotting line using code like this:

hNewton = [];
while % terminating condition
    % [Newtons method]
    t = toc;    
    if isempty(hNewton)
        hNewton = plot(t,log(abs(f(z))),'b*-');  % First time through plot and save the line handle
    else
        % On all subsequent passes, just add to the lines X/Y data
        set(hNewton,'XData',[get(hNewton,'XData')  t]);
        set(hNewton,'YData',[get(hNewton,'YData')  log(abs(f(z)))]);
    end
end

Since there are now only 2 lines, the legend works as expected.

Alternatively, you could put the code to add data to an existing line in a function

function hLineHandle = AddToLine( hLineHandle, xData, yData, lineStyle )
% AddToLine - Add data to a plotted line
    if isempty(hLineHandle)
        hLineHandle = plot(xData,yData, lineStyle);
    else
        set(hLineHandle,'XData',[get(hLineHandle,'XData')  xData]);
        set(hLineHandle,'YData',[get(hLineHandle,'YData')  yData]);
    end
end

Which makes the code in the main script/function a lot cleaner.

hNewton = [];
while % terminating condition
    % [Newtons method]
    t = toc;    
    hNewton = AddToLine(hNewton,t, log(abs(f(z))),'b*-' );
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. That's exactly what I was looking for. Although I'll probably end up implementing Bas Swinckels's solution, now that I know my prejudice against it is irrational, but it's good to know how to add to data to a line object in case I ever need it (say, for animation). –  bongbang Sep 23 '13 at 14:04
1  
Note that this solution does in fact grow the XData and YData vectors on every iteration, which will get slower and slower (at iteration i, you are throwing a way a vector of length i-1 and creating a new one of size i, so in total it will use n^2 / 2 memory. One possibility might be to start plotting a vector of NaNs and just change the number at the correct index. Not sure if matlab allows modifying those vectors. –  Bas Swinckels Sep 23 '13 at 14:04

You can use line object, for example:

f = (x) % define function
figure
hold on
lHandle1 = line(nan, nan); %# Generate a blank line and return the line handle
lHandle2 = line(nan, nan); %# Generate a blank line and return the line handle

%% Newton
tic
while % terminating condition
    % [Newtons method]
    t = get(lHandle1, 'XData');
    Y1 = get(lHandle1, 'YData');

    t = toc;
    Y1 = [Y1 log(abs(f(z)];
    set(lHandle1, 'XData', t, 'YData', Y1, 'LineWidth', 2 ,'Color' , [0 1 0]);

end

%% Secant
tic
while % terminating condition
    % [secant method]
    t = get(lHandle2, 'XData');
    Y2 = get(lHandle2, 'YData');

    t = toc;
    Y2 = [Y2 log(abs(f(z)];
    set(lHandle2, 'XData', t, 'YData', Y2, 'LineWidth', 2 ,'Color' , [1 0 0]);

end

legend('Newton''s','Secant')
share|improve this answer

Good example of only showing the relevant parts of your code to ask a question. The others have explained tricks to have the legend behave as you want. I would go for a different solution, by saving your measurements in a vector and doing the plots after the loops. This has 2 advantages: you do not have to do the tricks with the legend, but more importantly, you are not doing a plot inside your loop, which potentially takes a lot of time. I would guess that your timing is dominated by the plotting, so the influence of your algorithm will hardly show up in the results. So change your code to something like this (untested):

f = (x) % define function
% preallocate plenty of space
[t_newton, t_secant, f_newton, f_secant] = deal(nan(1, 1000));

%% Newton
tic;
i = 1;
while % terminating condition
    % [Newtons method]
    f_newton(i) = current_result;
    t_newton(i) = toc;
    i = i + 1;
end

%% Secant
tic;
i = 1;
while % terminating condition
    % [secant method]
    f_secant(i) = current_result;    
    t_secant(i) = toc;
    i = i + 1;
end

% trim NaNs (not really needed, not plotted anyhow)
t_newton = t_newton(isfinite(t_newton));
f_newton = f_newton(isfinite(f_newton));
t_secant = t_secant(isfinite(t_secant));
f_secant = f_secant(isfinite(f_secant));

% do the plot
semilogy(t_newton, abs(f_newton), t_secant, abs(f_secant))
legend('Newton''s','Secant')
share|improve this answer
    
I assumed that @bongbang knew the plot function worked with vectors and so had other reasons for plotting on the fly. Your answer is definitely more efficient than plotting on each iteration and I agree that iterative plotting will likely dominant the overall timing. –  grantnz Sep 23 '13 at 8:26
    
@grantnz Other than for monitoring a real-time process or slow calculation, or in case you would need a lot of extra storage to save the intermediate results, I cannot think of a good reason to do iterative plotting. In this case, the result of each iteration is a simple scalar and the loop is presumably pretty fast. –  Bas Swinckels Sep 23 '13 at 8:41
    
Yes, Bas Swinckels, I knew I could do that, as @grantnz assumed. I just didn't want to store results that I don't really want to keep, especially since the size of the vector would increase each time (I've been told that's a bad thing). It's probably unreasonable on my part, since your way would end up using fewer resources. –  bongbang Sep 23 '13 at 13:22
1  
@bongbang Yes, growing a vector in a loop is considered bad, since it leads to O(n^2) behavior. The correct way to solve this is to pre-allocate the space you need. If the number of iterations is known, you can do this exactly. If this number is unknown, like in your case, you could over-allocate by a generous amount, and trim afterwards, that is what I did with [t_newton, ...] = deal(nan(1,1000)) and t_newton = t_newton(isfinite(...)). If you are just storing a few numbers per iteration and the number of iterations is not too large (even up to 1e6), this is a good solution. –  Bas Swinckels Sep 23 '13 at 13:51
1  
@bongbang Growing a vector is unlikely to have any meaningful impact on performance unless the number elements added is very large. Even adding 10 million elements to a vector has a penalty of less then 2 seconds (over pre-allocating). For moderate numbers of elements (e.g 1000), the difference is tiny (less than a millisecond). It's often said that "Premature optimisation is the root of all evil" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Program_optimization –  grantnz Sep 23 '13 at 20:42

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