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Is there a way to get a C stream object (a FILE* object) that points at nothing?

I know fopen("/dev/null","w"); would work but I'm wondering if there is a better way.

Preferably that bit buckets the data at a higher level than the posix layer and that is also more portable.

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5  
Why do you need to do this? There's probably a better way to do what you are trying to do. –  Andrey Dec 13 '09 at 1:18
    
I have some logging in place that goes to stderr and I want to be able to turn it off with a flag. I'd really rather not have to do more to it than change the variable that gets passed to fprintf. –  BCS Dec 13 '09 at 1:31
1  
Similar to stackoverflow.com/questions/1741191/…. The stdio implementation always seems to support such things, but the API doesn't provide a nice way to use it. –  Edmund Dec 13 '09 at 2:15

2 Answers 2

No: /dev/null on Unix and NUL: on Windows (in the absence of Cygwin or equivalent) is the best way to do it.

(The original version of the question mentioned fopen("/dev/null","o"); but has since been fixed.)
Oh, and the "o" flag to fopen() is non-portable. The portable forms include flag characters r, w, a, b, + in various combinations.

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what does the "o" flag do? it's not in my manpages –  Matt Joiner Dec 13 '09 at 1:31
    
"O"K, I knew I should have looked that up. I was working from memory. –  BCS Dec 13 '09 at 1:33
    
@Anacrolix: I've no idea what 'o' does; it isn't portable and doesn't apply to the systems I have available...I think it was intended to be a variant on 'w'. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 13 '09 at 1:34
    
why the : - on Windows, the null device is called NUL (see eg msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… for a complete list of reserved file names) –  Christoph Dec 13 '09 at 13:31
    
@Christoph: because I was under the illusion that the colon was either necessary or desirable to indicate that it was the device that you wanted. If it fails with the colon, it is a fixable fault in my answer; if the colon is merely unnecessary, then put it down to a bad habit picked up sometime in the previous millennium. I am not completely alone in my understanding - see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOS#Reserved_device_names. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 13 '09 at 13:47

I have some logging in place that goes to stderr and I want to be able to turn it off with a flag. I'd really rather not have to do more to it than change the variable that gets passed to fprintf

a) Wrapper function

logging = TRUE;
void debugprint(...)
{
    if (logging)   
    {
        fprintf(stderr, ...);
    }
}

b) I think fprintf will return if you give it a null pointer. Can't remember -- give it a try. Then all you have to do is change the pointer :)

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a) for that much work I could switch to a real logging system. b) that's worth looking into +1 –  BCS Dec 13 '09 at 1:46
    
b)a quick look around seems to indicate that fprintf(NULL,""); will fail. –  BCS Dec 13 '09 at 1:50
    
All you would have to do is add one function and search + replace for all instances for fprintf(stderr). –  Pod Dec 13 '09 at 1:55
    
I thought it might. C std lib tends not to check it's parameters. –  Pod Dec 13 '09 at 1:56
    
Passing a null file pointer to fprintf() leads to undefined behaviour, and usually to a crash and core dump on Unix-like systems. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 13 '09 at 4:59

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