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When I run my program like ./program a b c d instead of

./program -i inFile -o outFile

it tells me something is wrong with the file opening (which is true )but

Expected: "Usage: program -i inputfile -o outputfile\n"
Got: "Error: Cannot open file /no/such/file\n" 

Do you know how should I handle this? Any clue? Also this is part of my code which deals with bad argument handling:

if ((s= strrchr( argv[0], '\\')) /* get filename w/o .exe extension */
                  || (s= strrchr( argv[0], '/')))
              s++;
        else
              s= argv[0];
        if(inFile == NULL || outFile == NULL) {
        error_usage(s);
         }
        if ( argc !=5 )
           {
             error_usage(s);
             return -1;
           }
        while ((c = getopt(argc, argv, "i:o:")) != -1) {
            switch (c) {


         case 'i':
                          inFile = strdup(optarg);
                 break;
                 case 'o':
                          outFile = strdup(optarg);
                 break;
                 default:

                          error_usage(s);

                      }
                }

      if (!(iFile = fopen(inFile, "r+"))) {
      fprintf(stderr, "Error: Cannot open file %s\n", inFile);
      exit(1);
   }
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2  
Pick one C or C++ I think you need C. –  Grijesh Chauhan Sep 23 '13 at 6:12
    
Yes C but I thought they should be almost the same regarding bad argument handling. my bad –  Mona Jalal Sep 23 '13 at 6:13
    
Why do you check inFile and outFile against NULL before you process the arguments? –  David Schwartz Sep 23 '13 at 6:14
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2 Answers

Well all I can do is repeat the answer to your earlier question, which I think was the correct answer all along.

See inFile and outFile to NULL, then after your getopts loop check to see if either is still NULL. If they are then print the usage message and exit

    inFile = outFile = NULL;
    while ((c = getopt(argc, argv, "i:o:")) != -1) {
        switch (c) {
        case 'i':
            inFile = strdup(optarg);
            break;
        case 'o':
            outFile = strdup(optarg);
            break;
        default:
            error_usage(s);
        }
    }
    if (inFile == NULL || outFile == NULL)
        error_usage(s);

You placed the check on inFile and outFile in the wrong place in your code. It should go after the while loop. What you are doing is checking if the earlier while loop sets the values of both inFile and outFile and complaining to the user if it does not. And as I said before I don't think if (argc != 5) is helpful, I would just delete it.

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2  
If this is a duplicate, could you please close-vote it as such? –  Kerrek SB Sep 23 '13 at 6:18
    
@KerrekSB It's not precisely the same queston, but I think the question was poorly asked in the eariler post. This one is better. –  john Sep 23 '13 at 6:20
    
@john I am doing the same exact thing as you have written above but I am failing on ./program a b c d telling me some error about opening the file rather than being guided to calling usage_error function. Any pointers? –  Mona Jalal Sep 23 '13 at 6:28
    
@MonaJalal I don't see how that's possible, I'm guessing you've made a mistake somewhere else. Could you post the entire code? –  john Sep 23 '13 at 6:35
    
Can this help? if (argv[1]!= "i") error_usage(s); if (argv[3]!="o") error_usage(s); –  Mona Jalal Sep 23 '13 at 6:39
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Getopt doesn't know about "mandatory" arguments. It will parse all the arguments it can find, but it is your responsibility to check the higher-level logic, i.e. whether a consistent set of arguments has been supplied, etc.

Also, you don't generally need to copy strings, since the original string will always be there. The following might work just fine:

char const * infile = NULL;

// ...

case 'i':
    infile = optarg;
    break;

// ....

if (!infile)
{
    puts("Error, you must specify an input file. Use -h for help.\n");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
};
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