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This is a stupid small problem we had at work that a few of us have different solutions to, and we're wondering if there's a better way to do it. I'll boil it down to something really simple for the sake of example.

Say we have a multidimensional array with the below values in it. Each value is it's own element, and each row is an array.

0a00
000b
c000

In the above "array", $array[0][1] would be "a", $array[1][3] would be "b", and $array[2][0] would be "c". What we need to do, is increment all values adjacent to non-numeric values by 1. So, the array after we've incremented the values should look like the below array. The current solution we have is to first check all 4 "corners" of the array, increment the adjacent values, then check the top and bottom rows, then check the first and last columns, and finally, check all other elements. Whenever we hit a non-numeric element, we increment all other adjacent non-numeric elements by 1. This is kind of lame/cumbersome, and we know there has to be a better way. It's pretty much building a bombsweeper board in reverse, when you know where all of the bombs are.

1a21
222b
c111

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I guess you output the result or somehow query it at least. Why don't you count the numbers of neightbours at the time you output that specific field ? This still is O(n*n) but it won't get any faster. –  Christoph Sep 23 '13 at 6:56
    
Ah, ok. We figured there had to be a more efficient way that didn't involve the nested loops we use. And you're correct, we output it. The actual arrays are a lot more complicated, but they model some data and we do more than just increment each adjacent value by 1 in the real problem. –  user797963 Sep 23 '13 at 6:58
1  
You have to check each field at least once to know if it's a number or not so at least this part will still be O(width*height). –  Christoph Sep 23 '13 at 7:00
    
What is the benefit of checking the corners, then the top and bottom rows? Surely you would just loop over each element, and increment the (up to) 8 values that are adjacent? –  Zack Newsham Sep 23 '13 at 7:06
    
There is no real benefit other than lazy design and it was logical when stubbing this out (corners have a set # of adjacent elements, as do top/bottom/left/right rows/columns). No real need or benefit. –  user797963 Sep 23 '13 at 18:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have in mind this simple algorithm:

function getNeighborsCount($rgData, $iX, $iY)
{
   if(ord($rgData[$iX][$iY])>=ord('a') && ord($rgData[$iX][$iY])<=ord('z'))
   {
      return null;
   }
   $iResult = 0;
   for($i=$iX-1; $i<=$iX+1; $i++)
   {
      for($j=$iY-1; $j<=$iY+1; $j++)
      {
         if(isset($rgData[$i][$j]) && 
            ord($rgData[$i][$j])>=ord('a') && 
            ord($rgData[$i][$j])<=ord('z'))
         {
            $iResult++;
         }
      }
   }
   return $iResult;
}

-then apply it to whole array:

$rgData = [
   str_split('0a00'),
   str_split('000b'),
   str_split('c000')
];

for($i=0; $i<count($rgData); $i++)
{
   for($j=0; $j<count($rgData[$i]); $j++)
   {
      if($iCount = getNeighborsCount($rgData, $i, $j))
      {
         $rgData[$i][$j]=$iCount;
      }
   }
}

-this will result with

echo(join(PHP_EOL, array_map(function($rgStr)
{
   return join('', $rgStr);
}, $rgData)));

to:

1a21
222b
c111

Now, about complexity. If we have N elements, it will be O(9N) since we're iterating 9 times for each element inside function.

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Thanks, I really like this. –  user797963 Sep 23 '13 at 18:18

Funny little puzzle. Try the following:


    $arr = array(
        array(0, 'a', 0, 0),
        array(0, 0, 0, 'b'),
        array('c', 0, 0, 0),
    );

    $max_i = count($arr);
    $max_j = count($arr[0]);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $max_i; $i++) {
        for ($j = 0; $j < $max_j; $j++) {
            if (!is_int($arr[$i][$j])) {
                for ($_i = $i - 1; $_i <= $i + 1; $_i++) {
                    for ($_j = $j - 1; $_j <= $j + 1; $_j++) {
                        if (($_i == $i && $_j == $j) || $_i < 0 || $_i >= $max_i || $_j < 0 || $_j >= $max_j) {
                            continue;
                        }
                        if (is_int($arr[$_i][$_j])) {
                            $arr[$_i][$_j]++;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

Not sure if this is the most efficient way, but it should be shorter than what you have.

share|improve this answer
    
I really like this solution as well. This is close to what we ended up implementing (only we use isset to check if an element exists vs the <0 and > max checks). –  user797963 Sep 23 '13 at 18:20

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