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I have a while loop inside which I want to do a specific operation only once, and a different operation for all other loop runs.

while (..) {
  if ( 0 == count ) {
       // do_this
  } else {
       // do_that
  }
  count++;
}

Here, count needs to be compared with 0 only once but it is unnecessarily compared in each loop run. Is there an alternative way where the comparison happens only once and once succeeded is not again called?

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marked as duplicate by Marc Claesen, nijansen, JB., Grijesh Chauhan, chrylis Sep 23 '13 at 9:43

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Are you sure that the performance hit is relevant? Rewriting the code without the if() block might be faster, but is it as clear for developers as it is now? –  Stefano Sanfilippo Sep 23 '13 at 8:36
    
You shouldn't be concerned with this too much because this is exactly the kind of if CPU's branch prediction algorithm handles perfectly. –  Violet Giraffe Sep 23 '13 at 9:10
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3 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Either do the thing for count == 0 before the loop, or if that's not possible (because it's in the middle of other things that are being done) just write your code to be human readable and any half decent compiler will figure it out for you. Or it will not figure it out and the branch predictor in the CPU will do the job. Either way a nano-optimization like this will most likely cost you more time reading the code than you'll ever save on execution time.

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3  
+1 for mentioning the branch predictor. That will certainly kick in if the loop has sufficient iterations. And if it doesn't, no need to bother anyway. –  Angew Sep 23 '13 at 7:14
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{
    // do_this
}
count = 1; /*assuming count previously started at zero*/
while (..) {
    // do_that
    count++; /*although some folk prefer ++count as it's never slower than count++*/
}

is better

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You must warp anything with if(...) statememt, otherwise it's not the same. –  Arpegius Sep 23 '13 at 7:07
    
Arpegius: indeed you do; // do this should be in braces. I've amended the answer. –  Bathsheba Sep 23 '13 at 7:08
    
thanks, that's cool. But it won't look clean when I have a while loop with getline e.g. when I'm reading a file and want to do some operation only for first line of file. In that case, with your scheme I'll need to call getline twice once in do_this and at another time in while(..) –  user13107 Sep 23 '13 at 7:09
1  
@user13107: it may well not be clean but it will be clear. –  Bathsheba Sep 23 '13 at 7:12
1  
@user13107 It's better practice to write readable code that's easy to understand and leaving optimizations to the compiler. Write what is the most easy for you to read and understand. –  Art Sep 23 '13 at 7:24
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Don't optimize unnecessarily!

The cost of the compare is 1-2 clock cycles and as mentioned by Art it could be optimized away by the compiler. The cost is absolutely negligable when compared to the cost of reading from a file. The performance of your program will be bound by I/O anyway (either memory reads or disk reads depending on whether the file is mapped in memory).

In this case you should write the code so that it is easy to maintain.

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1  
While the cost of compare is small, the cost of a branch is generally pretty big. Not on the order of I/O, of course, but in a performance-critical piece of code, you do not want to stall the pipeline. –  Angew Sep 23 '13 at 8:12
    
@Angew The cost of the branch in this particular example is as close to optimal case for any branch predictor as you can get. You will either not stall the pipeline or you repeat the loop so few times that this whole optimization is meaningless. –  Art Sep 23 '13 at 13:26
    
@Art Yes, you said so in your answer, and I gave you +1 for it. But this answer does not mention that at all: it seems to say "even if it's not optimised away, the compare is just 1-2 clock cycles." Without saying why it's super-optimal for branch prediction, it sounds dangerous to me. –  Angew Sep 23 '13 at 14:16
    
@Angew Very true, sorry about that. Actually, I'd go a level further and say that theorizing about branch predictors and mentioning "clock cycles" at the level of this question is redundant and possibly even giving bad ideas to the asker. The answer should just be "write readable code and hit your knee with a hammer any time you try to be clever or optimize". –  Art Sep 23 '13 at 14:46
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