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I'm trying to implement ASP.Net FormsAuthentication across many applications. I have already got a working prototype of this that shares the same login in couple of applications. As described here, the applications need to share some settings for this to work, for example the machinekey-section:

<machineKey      validationKey="C50B3C89CB21F4F1422FF158A5B42D0E8DB8CB5CDA1742572A487D9401E3400267682B202B746511891C1BAF47F8D25C07F6C39A104696DB51F17C529AD3CABE" 
  decryptionKey="8A9BE8FD67AF6979E7D20198CFEA50DD3D3799C77AF2B72F" 
  validation="SHA1" />

I would like to have these settings in one place and use them in all of the applications. It would not make sense to have the same settings in 10 applications. If I want to change a setting, I want to do it in one place and have all the applications to use that afterwards.

Is it possible to have these settings for example in a class library project which the other applications use? How would you implement this? I tried the configSource-attribute, but I think I cannot use it with a config-file inside the class library. Am I right?

What other approaches have you used? All comments are welcome. Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

The best solution would be to define it in your web.config and include it in your deploy packages. Therefore, when you deploy a new version with modified web.config, the changes will be deployed everywhere.

You can also use the xml transforms (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd465326.aspx) to ease the management of these settings (debug and production settings may be different). You can then use a different project configuration (and therefore, web.config settings) for each publish profiles. The main advantage is that the whole process is then automated, less error-prone.

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