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Consider the following two tables:

Table A: [K1, K2, PropA] 

Table B: [K3, PropB]

The primary key of Table A is composite [K1,K2]. The primary key of table B is K3.

Table has an inclusive dependency on on table B- values in K3 have to be matched by value in K2. Unfortunately, since K2 is not a unique primary key, I can't define an foreign key constraint on these columns.

as I see it the solution is to either enforce it in the application layer or to propagate the K1 column to table B, so that it will contain the entire foreign key of table A.

My question: is this considered a good or bad practice in DB design? Assume that adding the extra column is not a problem from a maintenance perspective or integrity perspective (insert is transactional).

I am using MSSQL and Oracle.

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Is K3 unique? Can you put the foreign key on Table A -> K2 to map to K3? We need to know more specifics about the relation of the data to help you, but what you describe (or how I understand it) does not sound like good practice. –  LuigiEdlCarno Sep 23 '13 at 7:46
    
@Vitaliy You didn't mention what DBMS you are using. Note that not all DBMSs suffer this limitation. In some cases (MySQL is one example) you can create referential integrity constraints between two tables even where the target of such a constraint is non-unique and not nullable. There are possible workarounds for software that doesn't directly support such constraints. Your question does raise an important point: the often poor support for data integrity constraints offered in modern database software means database designers sometimes have to make some awkward compromises. –  sqlvogel Sep 23 '13 at 9:10
    
If there are multiple values of K1 for a particular K2 value, which one would be used in Table B? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 23 '13 at 9:10
    
@sqlvogel - MSSQL and Oracle. –  Vitaliy Sep 23 '13 at 9:57
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever - K2 which is unique in B. –  Vitaliy Sep 23 '13 at 9:58

2 Answers 2

Create table C, with just one attribute, K2, which is the primary key. Now you can reference K2 with a foreign key constraint.

It would probably be a bad idea to put the K1 attribute into table B. If I've understood you correctly doing that looks like it would create a non-key dependency in violation of 2NF.

Your question does raise an important point: the often poor support for data integrity constraints offered in modern database software means database designers sometimes have to make some awkward compromises.

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But the problem remains, since I still need to maintain referential integrity between A and C. The violation is indeed there. The question is whether the gain is greater than the loss (I think so, but I am looking for an expert advice). –  Vitaliy Sep 23 '13 at 8:22
1  
You can create a foreign key constraint in A which references C and another in B which references C. Integrity is maintained in 2 RI constraints instead of 1. –  sqlvogel Sep 23 '13 at 8:23
    
I see, but than I can't use cascading delete.. (That starts from table A and should propagate to B). I did not mention this initially, but it is a shame to lose this. –  Vitaliy Sep 23 '13 at 8:33
    
@sqlvogel: B might reference a value that is in C, but is not in A. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Sep 24 '13 at 18:14
    
@Mike: "Your question does raise an important point: the often poor support for data integrity constraints offered in modern database software means database designers sometimes have to make some awkward compromises." –  sqlvogel Sep 24 '13 at 18:19

"... the solution is to either enforce it in the application layer or to propagate ..."

You see right or you see wrong, depending on perspective.

The true solution is for the DBMS vendors to support the general case of inclusion dependencies, of which the foreign key is only a special case.

But as long as the DBMS vendors don't do that, you are right, as long as you keep restraining yourself to those vendors' offerings, you'll have no other choice than to move constraint enforcement to the application [*], or screw up the design with all those ugly hacks you need in order to get your constraint enforced using just FKs.

A system that offers you a solution that involves neither of "enforcement in the application" and "screw up the design" is at shark.armchair.mb.ca/~erwin. Disclosure : that project is of my own making.

[*] or put all the constraint enforcement code in triggers, such that at least a new application cannot "forget" to enforce some given existing business rule.

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