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I am using pykeylogger and want to extend it a little bit by adding information about current keyboard layout selected (right now you know from log what buttons are pressed assuming US qwerty).

For windows system it is looks like:

def get_locale(self):
        if os.name == 'nt':
            w = user32.GetForegroundWindow() 
            tid = user32.GetWindowThreadProcessId(w, 0) 
            return hex(user32.GetKeyboardLayout(tid))

to get hex code of layout (like 0x409409) that is fine for me as I basically want to distinguish one layout from another.

I would appreciate if you give me a solution for posix (for example ubuntu) system.

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Try /etc/default/keyboard/ –  DanielB Sep 23 '13 at 9:04
    
@DanielB do you mean that I can read from /etc/default/keyboard and thus get layout for current application in focus? For me sudo cat /etc/default/keyboard command returns same content for any current layout –  Meta Sep 23 '13 at 10:35

2 Answers 2

setxkbmap -print

xkb_keymap {
xkb_keycodes  { include "evdev+aliases(qwerty)" };
xkb_types     { include "complete"  };
xkb_compat    { include "complete"  };
xkb_symbols   { include "pc+gb+gr(simple):2+inet(evdev)+terminate(ctrl_alt_bksp)"   };
xkb_geometry  { include "pc(pc105)" };
};

xkb_keycodes { include "evdev+aliases(qwerty)" };

xkb_symbols { include "pc+gb+ gr (simple):2+inet(evdev)+terminate(ctrl_alt_bksp)" };

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yes setxkbmap -print gives me the list of installed layouts but how can I detect which one is active right now? –  Meta Sep 24 '13 at 2:11
    
if you want to know whats actice right now you can use xkb-switch. link. example: xkb-switch --> gr(simple), xkb-switch --> gb –  Foo Bar User Sep 24 '13 at 8:19
    
I will check this out. Thank you! –  Meta Sep 24 '13 at 16:49
    
well its not in python but you can make a small script that wgets it untars it cd in it and build it. then you can popen call it. not sure if thats the best solution but it will work. –  Foo Bar User Sep 24 '13 at 18:21
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have found following that works for me:

  1. compiled xkblayout-state and moved executable to directory in PATH
  2. rewrote get_locale as
import os
if os.name == 'posix':    
    from subprocess import check_output
elif os.name == 'nt':
    import win32api, win32con, win32process
    from ctypes import windll
    user32 = windll.user32

def get_locale(self):
    if os.name == 'nt':
        w = user32.GetForegroundWindow() 
        tid = user32.GetWindowThreadProcessId(w, 0) 
        return hex(user32.GetKeyboardLayout(tid))
    elif os.name == 'posix':
        return check_output(["xkblayout-state", "print", "%s"])

and now get_locale returns nice letter code of current locale (i.e. 'us' for qwerty) in Ubuntu.

Yes, output is different in each OS and I will definitely rewrite this function in the future. But for now I have achieved my goal to be able to detect keyboard layout at windows and unix machines.

Another option is to use xset utility like xset -q | grep -A 0 'LED' | cut -c59-67 (see this question for details) but I think that it's little bit fishy especially if you have more than two layouts (like I do) - scroll LED is on for all except default layout.

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