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I have the following code

my $string = "My mother-in-law lives in Europe";
my @words = split(/(-)|\s+/, $string);

I expect the result to be like My,mother,-,in,-,law,lives,in,Europe , but I am getting this error

Use of uninitialized value $_ in string , when I try to print the array by using foreach .

right now , I am doing with print

foreach  (@words)
{
    print "$_" , "\n" if $_;
}

Is there a better solution by modifying the split statement itself ?

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@RohitJain I have given the code now –  user2728203 Sep 23 '13 at 9:12
    
I'm not sure how you're getting this error, see this. –  Jerry Sep 23 '13 at 9:19

4 Answers 4

This works for me:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict; 

my $string = "My mother-in-law lives in Europe";

my @words = split('(-)|\s+', $string); # Not capturing space

foreach  (@words){
    print "$_" , "\n" if $_;
}

Output:

My
mother
-
in
-
law
lives
in
Europe
share|improve this answer
    
see my question correctly I want this output without the if condition at last print "$_" , "\n" if $_; –  user2728203 Sep 23 '13 at 9:36
    
@user94962 Check out my answer. –  Rohit Jain Sep 23 '13 at 9:55

Since you want to avoid that if part after print, you can use the regex pattern as in following code:

my $string = "My mother-in-law lives in Europe";
my @words = split(/(?<=-)|(?=-)|\s+/, $string);

foreach  (@words){
    print "$_" , "\n";
}

This will split on empty string that is followed by - or preceded by -, and also on whitespace. Thus giving you - as separate element, and also avoiding captured groups.

Output:

My
mother
-
in
-
law
lives
in
Europe
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1  
I dont want the space to be captured –  user2728203 Sep 23 '13 at 9:20

This is caused by the capture group in the regex that you provide to split and can be seen clearly with Data::Dumper.

perl -MData::Dumper -e 'my $string = "My mother-in-law lives in Europe"; 
  my @words = split(/(-)|\s+/, $string); print Dumper(\@words);'

$VAR1 = [
      'My',
      undef,
      'mother',
      '-',
      'in',
      '-',
      'law',
      undef,
      'lives',
      undef,
      'in',
      undef,
      'Europe'
    ];

There are two approaches you can use:

  1. use grep to remove the undef's from the array.

    grep defined, split /(-)|\s+/, $string;
    
  2. Use split twice, first for spaces, secondly for hyphens.

    map { split /(-)/ } split /\s+/, $string
    
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2  
I need the hyphen to be captured but not spaces –  user2728203 Sep 23 '13 at 9:20

You can also add whitespace between the hyphen before splitting to make sure they are treated as a single field.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @my_line = ("My mother-in-law lives in Europe");

foreach (@my_line) {
    s/-/ - /g;
    print "$_\n" foreach split;
}

OUTPUT

My
mother
-
in
-
law
lives
in
Europe

Note that you can also use a slice to get just the field you want.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $string = "My mother-in-law lives in Europe";

print "$_\n" foreach (split /(-)|\s+/, $string)[0, 2 .. 6, 8, 10, 12];
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