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Conditions: do not modifiy the original lists; JDK only, no external libraries. Bonus points for a one-liner or a JDK 1.3 version.

Is there a simpler way than:

List<String> newList = new ArrayList<String>();
newList.addAll(listOne);
newList.addAll(listTwo);
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1  
If you are doing this solely for iteration purposes see another question - there are google guava and java 8 solutions stackoverflow.com/questions/4896662/… –  Boris Treukhov Jul 7 at 15:43

23 Answers 23

Off the top of my head, I can shorten it by one line:

List<String> newList = new ArrayList<String>(listOne);
newList.addAll(listTwo);
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20  
While you're technically correct, you have shortened it by one line, the asymmetry of this bugs me. Enough that I'm happier to "spend" the extra line. –  Robert Atkins Dec 15 '11 at 0:54

hmmm it exists ListUtils.union(list1,list2); works cool!

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7  
Nice, but requires apache commons. He did specify 'no external libraries' –  Quantum7 Apr 26 '11 at 1:17
22  
@Quantum7, still useful for other people ;) Also, is apache commons even an external library? I don't start anything without it! –  tster Mar 30 '12 at 23:31
9  
Union is different than concatenation of two lists... –  Platinum Azure Aug 24 '12 at 18:32
9  
@Platinum No, according to the docs ListUtils.union is exactly equivalent to OP's code. But perhaps it is misleading to use a SET operation ("Union") in a list context. I can see how you might expect this to remove duplicates or something, but it appears the method does not do that. –  Quantum7 Dec 17 '12 at 23:52
1  
Avoid Apache Commons Collections. It’s not typesafe, there are no generics. Great if you use Java 1.4, but for Java 5 and above, I’d prefer Google Guava. –  Michael Piefel Sep 8 '13 at 19:37

Probably not simpler, but intriguing and ugly:

List<String> newList = new ArrayList<String>() { { addAll(listOne); addAll(listTwo); } };

Don't use it in production code... ;)

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3  
shudder - fun though –  Draemon Oct 10 '08 at 0:59
6  
Ugly and evil, just as almost any use of double brace initialization. It ís shorter, though ;) –  Jorn Aug 15 '09 at 20:50
3  
@MarnixKlooster: Eclipse knows that you should not use it and makes it unpleasant to use ;-) –  Joachim Sauer Oct 3 '11 at 7:06
4  
Though it is physically one line, I do not consider this a "one-liner". –  splungebob Dec 13 '12 at 21:28
4  
why do people hate anonymous block initializers –  NimChimpsky Dec 21 '12 at 13:01

One of your requirements is to preserve the original lists. If you create a new list and use addAll(), you are effectively doubling the number of references to the objects in your lists. This could lead to memory problems if your lists are very large.

If you don't need to modify the concatenated result, you can avoid this using a custom list implementation. The custom implementation class is more than one line, obviously...but using it is short and sweet.

CompositeUnmodifiableList.java:

public class CompositeUnmodifiableList<E> extends AbstractList<E> {

    private final List<E> list1;
    private final List<E> list2;

    public CompositeUnmodifiableList(List<E> list1, List<E> list2) {
        this.list1 = list1;
        this.list2 = list2;
    }

    @Override
    public E get(int index) {
        if (index < list1.size()) {
            return list1.get(index);
        }
        return list2.get(index-list1.size());
    }

    @Override
    public int size() {
        return list1.size() + list2.size();
    }
}

Usage:

List<String> newList = new CompositeUnmodifiableList<String>(listOne,listTwo);
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3  
This is the real answer to this question. –  Wouter Lievens Oct 29 '13 at 13:02

Found this question looking to concatenate arbitrary amount of lists, not minding external libraries. So, perhaps it will help someone else:

com.google.common.collect.Iterables#concat()

Useful if you want to apply the same logic to a number of different collections in one for().

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For example: Lists.newArrayList(Iterables.concat(list1,list2)); –  meilechh Feb 13 at 17:14

Not simpler, but without resizing overhead:

List<String> newList = new ArrayList<>(listOne.size() + listTwo.size());
newList.addAll(listOne);
newList.addAll(listTwo);
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A little shorter would be:

List<String> newList = new ArrayList<String>(listOne);
newList.addAll(listTwo);
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In Java 8:

List<String> newList = Stream.concat(listOne.stream(), listTwo.stream()).collect(Collectors.<String>toList());
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Gawd, that's a thing in Java 8? Technically you win I guess, but that's a heck of a long line :-) –  Robert Atkins Sep 9 '13 at 20:03

This is simple and just one line, but will add the contents of listTwo to listOne. Do you really need to put the contents in a third list?

Collections.addAll(listOne, listTwo.toArray());
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1  
Not modifying the original lists was one of the criteria, but this is useful to have here as an example for situations where that's not a constraint. –  Robert Atkins Sep 9 '13 at 20:01

You can do a oneliner if the target list is predeclared.

(newList = new ArrayList<String>(list1)).addAll(list2);
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4  
so, in other words, a 2 liner... –  AdamC Oct 10 '08 at 19:50

I'm not claiming that it's simple, but you mentioned bonus for one-liners ;-)

Collection mergedList = Collections.list(new sun.misc.CompoundEnumeration(new Enumeration[] {
    new Vector(list1).elements(),
    new Vector(list2).elements(),
    ...
}))
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2  
For what it's worth, you should never use sun.misc.* classes... –  Steven Schlansker Jan 30 '13 at 23:53
    
why should someone never use those? –  David Jun 3 '13 at 16:27
2  
@David because it aimed to be used internally in JDK. If you used that in your code, your code will quite probably not running on non-Sun (or non-Oracle now) JDK/JRE. –  Adrian Shum Jul 23 '13 at 7:06

Slightly simpler:

List<String> newList = new ArrayList<String>(listOne);
newList.addAll(listTwo);
share|improve this answer
    
Would this cause duplicated Strings? Meaning a String that exists in both list will exist twice in the resulting list? –  Zainodis Jun 13 '12 at 10:33
1  
@Zainodis Yes, there could be duplicates. The List structure imposes no uniqueness constraints. You can remove dupes by doing the same thing with sets. Set<String> newSet = new HashSet<>(setOne); newSet.addAll(setTwo); –  Patrick Dec 27 '12 at 17:01
    
@Patrick Thanks for the clarification - that's what I did in the end - a couple of months ago though :) –  Zainodis Dec 28 '12 at 19:19
1  
@Zainodis I mostly replied to leave documentation for future visitors to the question, especially since people (including myself) forget to come back and add new knowledge. –  Patrick Dec 28 '12 at 21:54
    
@Patrick Sorry, I didn't mean anything by my comment. I am sure your comment will be helpful for others looking into the same issue. No offence :) –  Zainodis Dec 29 '12 at 8:42

it is ok for you to try to make it one liner, but it will not be ok for production and other purposes or people to understand your code after it's off your hands. the clearer the better

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List<?> newList = ListUtils.combine(list1, list2);

Oh, you have to implement the combine method :-)

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The smartest in my opinion:

/**
 * @param smallLists
 * @return one big list containing all elements of the small ones, in the same order.
 */
public static <E> List<E> concatenate (final List<E> ... smallLists)
{
    final ArrayList<E> bigList = new ArrayList<E>();
    for (final List<E> list: smallLists)
    {
        bigList.addAll(list);
    }
    return bigList;
}
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Use a Helper class.

I suggest:

    public static <E> Collection<E> addAll(Collection<E> dest, Collection<? extends E>... src) {
    	for(Collection<? extends E> c : src) {
    		dest.addAll(c);
    	}

    	return dest;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    	System.out.println(addAll(new ArrayList<Object>(), Arrays.asList(1,2,3), Arrays.asList("a", "b", "c")));

    	// does not compile
    	// System.out.println(addAll(new ArrayList<Integer>(), Arrays.asList(1,2,3), Arrays.asList("a", "b", "c")));

    	System.out.println(addAll(new ArrayList<Integer>(), Arrays.asList(1,2,3), Arrays.asList(4, 5, 6)));
    }
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You could do it with a static import and a helper class

nb the generification of this class could probably be improved

public class Lists {

   private Lists() { } // can't be instantiated

   public static List<T> join(List<T>... lists) {
      List<T> result = new ArrayList<T>();
      for(List<T> list : lists) {
         result.addAll(list);
      }
      return results;
   }

}

Then you can do things like

import static Lists.join;
List<T> result = join(list1, list2, list3, list4);
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For generification, change first line of method into this (the rest of the code should follow ;)): public static <T> List<T> join(List<? extends T>... lists) –  volley Oct 10 '08 at 5:40
    
volley, that wont compile. Say no to arrays (of references)! –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 10 '08 at 8:18

Another Java 8 one-liner:

List<String> newList = Stream.of(listOne, listTwo).flatMap(x -> x.stream()).collect(Collectors.toList());

As a bonus, since Stream.of() is variadic, you may concatenate as many lists as you like.

List<String> newList = Stream.of(listOne, listTwo, listThree).flatMap(x -> x.stream()).collect(Collectors.toList());
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No way near one-liner, but I think this is the simplest:

List<String> newList = new ArrayList<String>(l1);
newList.addAll(l2);

for(String w:newList)
        System.out.printf("%s ", w);
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public static <T> List<T> merge(List<T>... args) {
    final List<T> result = new ArrayList<>();

    for (List<T> list : args) {
        result.addAll(list);
    }

    return result;
}
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public class TestApp {

/**
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println("Hi");
    Set<List<String>> bcOwnersList = new HashSet<List<String>>();
    List<String> bclist = new ArrayList<String>();
    List<String> bclist1 = new ArrayList<String>();
    List<String> object = new ArrayList<String>();
    object.add("BC11");
    object.add("C2");
    bclist.add("BC1");
    bclist.add("BC2");
    bclist.add("BC3");
    bclist.add("BC4");
    bclist.add("BC5");
    bcOwnersList.add(bclist);
    bcOwnersList.add(object);

    bclist1.add("BC11");
    bclist1.add("BC21");
    bclist1.add("BC31");
    bclist1.add("BC4");
    bclist1.add("BC5");

    List<String> listList= new ArrayList<String>();
    for(List<String> ll : bcOwnersList){
        listList = (List<String>) CollectionUtils.union(listList,CollectionUtils.intersection(ll, bclist1));
    }
    /*for(List<String> lists : listList){
        test = (List<String>) CollectionUtils.union(test, listList);
    }*/
    for(Object l : listList){
        System.out.println(l.toString());
    }
    System.out.println(bclist.contains("BC"));

}

}
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I can't improve on the two-liner in the general case without introducing your own utility method, but if you do have lists of Strings and you're willing to assume those Strings don't contain commas, you can pull this long one-liner:

List<String> newList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList((listOne.toString().subString(1, listOne.length() - 1) + ", " + listTwo.toString().subString(1, listTwo.length() - 1)).split(", ")));

If you drop the generics, this should be JDK 1.4 compliant (though I haven't tested that). Also not recommended for production code ;-)

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One-liner?

How about this? :P

List<String> merged = merged.addAll(list1.addAll(list2));

I didn't test, as I'm on the train, but good luck ;)

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protected by Mysticial Jul 28 '13 at 17:08

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