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I have a buffer to which I need to add a string after every iteration of a loop.

My buffer name is extensible_array. I don't know how to deal with the dynamic memory allocation.

I'm used to allocate the memory for the pointer once. But in this case, I need an extensible array, whose size can be increased if necessary, inside every iteration.

I don't want to allocate a large memory before the loop, because I have no idea about the coming strings. In the real program the string s will be an input and not like in the following simplified code.

unsigned char * extensible_array ;
// any memory allocation for extensible_array??
for(int i=0 ; i< 20; i++)
{
    string s = "hello "+i+" ";
    // any memory allocation for extensible_array??
    extensible_array += s;

}

Is there any C, C++ or Boost function that can help?

Thanks!

Edit 1

the extensible_array is necessary of type unsigned char *.

Edit 2

I need the address of the buffer not to change. I'm concerned by the Address and the Value.

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closed as off-topic by Konrad Rudolph, Walter, RDC, allprog, Benoit Sep 23 '13 at 21:36

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1  
Did You read about malloc and realloc ? Standard c functions. Should be that, what You might need. ( Though some people say, one should no more use them.... i do not know, why ). –  icbytes Sep 23 '13 at 10:27
2  
tadaboom: std::vector. –  jrok Sep 23 '13 at 10:27
    
string s = "hello "+i+" "; is this even valid c++ syntax? just wondering as i know this just from java and I also know attempting to modify string literals is undefiend behavior. –  Zaibis Sep 23 '13 at 10:33
    
@icbytes: You should use those functions in C. But, despite the tags, this looks more like C++, which has rather more robust ways of managing dynamic memory than juggling raw pointers. –  Mike Seymour Sep 23 '13 at 10:34
2  
Please explain what you mean by “for security reasons, my buffer must be of type unsigned char *.” – That statement makes no sense. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 23 '13 at 11:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

"I have a buffer to which I need to add a string after every iteration of a loop."

In case you work with strings only, a simple std::string will suffice:

std::string buffer;
for (...) {
    std::string str;
    ...
    buffer += str;
}

alternatively you might consider using std::ostringstream.

"I don't know how to deal with the dynamic memory allocation."
~> Use objects with automatic storage duration and you will not have to deal with memory management.

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1  
First thanks. But for security reasons, my buffer must be of type unsigned char *. –  Julia Sep 23 '13 at 10:32
7  
@user1459961: Huh? What security reasons? ..in case you're using some API that requires unsigned char* then buffer.c_str() and default built-in conversion will do. –  LihO Sep 23 '13 at 10:34
    
+1 for "Use objects with automatic storage duration and you will not have to deal with memory management" –  sehe Sep 23 '13 at 10:37

use std::stringsteam and std::string

#include <sstream>
#include <string>

std::stringstream ss;

for(int i=0 ; i< 20; i++)
{
    ss << "hello " << i << " ";
}

std::string s = ss.str();

Or if you use C++11, use std::to_string with std::string

std::string s;
for(int i=0 ; i<20; i++)
{
    s += "hello " + std::to_string(i) + " ";
}
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First thanks. But for security reasons, my buffer must be of type unsigned char *. –  Julia Sep 23 '13 at 10:31
16  
@user1459961: For security reasons, I suggest you learn about the C++ memory model in much more detail before writing any code that might have security implications. Juggling raw pointers will almost guarantee security (and other) issues. –  Mike Seymour Sep 23 '13 at 10:37
9  
@billz He obviously means job security, silly. –  райтфолд Sep 23 '13 at 10:48

If you're only adding (appending) strings, consider using std::string

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You can use realloc() (http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/memory/c/realloc)

The only problem is that is going to slow your program a bit. That is the standard solution from C, boost might have a better way.

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1  
Just note that your original pointer might not be valid after calling realloc. From the page you linked to: The function may move the memory block to a new location (whose address is returned by the function). –  gnud Sep 23 '13 at 10:30
    
I need the address of the buffer not to change. I'm concerned by the Address and the Value. –  Julia Sep 23 '13 at 10:34
    
Then I think realloc is not your guy :( Without changing the address, you can use a list and keep pointing to the new block created with malloc. (we're going a bit old school here) –  doart3 Sep 23 '13 at 10:35
    
@user1459961 Why it is that important that the adress doesn't change? who cares about another addres as far the values get moved to teh enw address too? –  Zaibis Sep 23 '13 at 11:25

If you work on windows you can reserve address range and assign real memory to it as you really need it. Look at VirtualAllocEx with MEM_RESERVE and MEM_COMMIT flag.

  1. Reserve full address range with MEM_RESERVE
  2. Make SEH for your main algo that do next thing. (Alternatively you can count which pages allocated and which is not by yourself.)

    • If page fault -> VirtualAllocEx with MEM_COMMIT for subrange.
    • Repeat instruction that cause SEH.

I think that you can do same on *nix but I can't say how exactly.

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