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I've been led to believe that for single variable assignment in T-SQL, set is the best way to go about things, for two reasons:

  • it's the ANSI standard for variable assignment
  • it's actually faster than doing a SELECT (for a single variable)

So...

SELECT @thingy = 'turnip shaped'

becomes

SET @thingy  = 'turnip shaped'

But how fast, is fast? Am I ever really going to notice the difference?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

SET is faster on single runs. You can prove this easily enough. Whether or not it makes a difference is up to you, but I prefer SET, since I don't see the point of SELECT if all the code is doing is an assignment. I prefer to keep SELECT confined to SELECT statements from tables, views, etc.

Here is a sample script, with the number of runs set to 1:

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @runs int
DECLARE @i int, @j int
SET @runs = 1
SET @i = 0
SET @j = 0

DECLARE @dtStartDate datetime, @dtEndDate datetime


WHILE @runs > 0
    BEGIN
    	SET @j = 0
    	SET @dtStartDate = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
    	WHILE @j < 1000000
    		BEGIN
    			SET @i = @j
    			SET @j = @j + 1
    		END
    	SELECT @dtEndDate = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
    	SELECT DATEDIFF(millisecond, @dtStartDate, @dtEndDate) AS SET_MILLISECONDS


    	SET @j = 0
    	SET @dtStartDate = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
    	WHILE @j < 1000000
    		BEGIN
    			SELECT @i = @j
    			SET @j = @j + 1
    		END
    	SELECT @dtEndDate = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
    	SELECT DATEDIFF(millisecond, @dtStartDate, @dtEndDate) AS SELECT_MILLISECONDS

    	SET @runs = @runs - 1
    END

RESULTS:

Run #1:

SET_MILLISECONDS

5093

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5186

Run #2:

SET_MILLISECONDS

4876

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5466

Run #3:

SET_MILLISECONDS

4936

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5453

Run #4:

SET_MILLISECONDS

4920

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5250

Run #5:

SET_MILLISECONDS

4860

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5093

Oddly, if you crank the number of runs up to say, 10, the SET begins to lag behind.

Here is a 10-run result:

SET_MILLISECONDS

5140

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5266

SET_MILLISECONDS

5250

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5466

SET_MILLISECONDS

5220

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5280

SET_MILLISECONDS

5376

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5280

SET_MILLISECONDS

5233

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5453

SET_MILLISECONDS

5343

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5423

SET_MILLISECONDS

5360

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5156

SET_MILLISECONDS

5686

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5233

SET_MILLISECONDS

5436

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5500

SET_MILLISECONDS

5610

SELECT_MILLISECONDS

5266

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nice, this is the kind of hard evidence I was looking for! Thanks dude! –  ninesided Oct 10 '08 at 0:58
    
This is good to know. –  Saif Khan Oct 10 '08 at 6:27

I don't speed is an issue, it has to do with more with the assignment feature set. I came across this a while ago and there is something new in SQL Server 2008...I heard, try googling SQL Set vs Select SQL SERVER 2008

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Would the voter that gave me -1 be man enough to say why????? –  Saif Khan Oct 9 '08 at 23:38
    
I think that's why we are here...to get answers. –  Saif Khan Oct 9 '08 at 23:40
    
How would you answer this then stackoverflow.com/questions/189610/… –  Saif Khan Oct 9 '08 at 23:44
    
I suspect you're kind of right, I think it might be down to one using less CPU time than the other but I'm not sure how to verify this –  ninesided Oct 9 '08 at 23:46

Take a look at the "execution plan", it should tell you the cost of each line of your statement

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1  
if you look at the execution plan for both of these, you'll see they both have a cost of zero –  ninesided Oct 9 '08 at 23:45
    
well thats basically your answer, the cost is negligible, so just stick with SET would be my advice –  Mark Oct 9 '08 at 23:54

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