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I've been trying to find some information regarding the new multitasking switcher in iOS 7 and especially the screenshot that the OS takes when the app is going into hibernation.

enter image description here

Is there any way to completely turn off this feature or screenshot? Or can I hide the app altogether from the switcher? The app needs to run in the background, but we do not want to show any screenshot from the app.

The screenshot is potentially a security-risk, think along the lines for banking-apps where your card number or account summary will be available to anyone that double taps on the home button on the device.

Anyone with any insight into this? Thanks.

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My current solution is to load blank view with the app logo once the app enters hibernation and remove it when the app returns, but that solution is hard to manage and seems like a hack rather than an elegant solution. Also, this solution fails from time to time depending on device etc. So it's not really a usable one. –  Tommie Sep 23 '13 at 12:45
    
@Rob - sure, i'll provide my solution shortly as an "answer", worst case is that this is actually the way to solve this. –  Tommie Sep 23 '13 at 12:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 44 down vote accepted

In the App Programming Guide for iOS, Apple says:

Remove sensitive information from views before moving to the background.

When an app transitions to the background, the system takes a snapshot of the app’s main window, which it then presents briefly when transitioning your app back to the foreground. Before returning from your applicationDidEnterBackground: method, you should hide or obscure passwords and other sensitive personal information that might be captured as part of the snapshot.

In addition to obscuring/replacing sensitive information, you might also want to tell iOS 7 to not take the screen snapshot via ignoreSnapshotOnNextApplicationLaunch. According to the documentation for this method:

If you feel that the snapshot cannot correctly reflect your app’s user interface when your app is relaunched, you can call [ignoreSnapshotOnNextApplicationLaunch] to prevent that snapshot image from being taken.

Having said that, it appears that the screen snapshot is still taken and I have therefore filed a bug report. But you should test further and see if using this setting helps.

If this was an enterprise app, you might also want to look into the appropriate setting of allowScreenShot outlined in the Restrictions Payload section of the Configuration Profile Reference.


Here is an implementation that achieves what I needed. You can present your own UIImageView, or your can use a delegate-protocol pattern to obscure the confidential information:

//  SecureDelegate.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@protocol SecureDelegate <NSObject>

- (void)hide:(id)object;
- (void)show:(id)object;

@end

I then gave my app delegate a property for that:

@property (weak, nonatomic) id<SecureDelegate> secureDelegate;

My view controller sets it:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    AppDelegate *delegate = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];
    delegate.secureDelegate = self;
}

The view controller obviously implements that protocol:

- (void)hide:(id)object
{
    self.passwordLabel.alpha = 0.0;
}

- (void)show:(id)object
{
    self.passwordLabel.alpha = 1.0;
}

And, finally, my app delegate avails itself of this protocol and property:

- (void)applicationWillResignActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    [application ignoreSnapshotOnNextApplicationLaunch];  // this doesn't appear to work, whether called here or `didFinishLaunchingWithOptions`, but seems prudent to include it

    [self.secureDelegate hide:@"applicationWillResignActive:"];  // you don't need to pass the "object", but it was useful during my testing...
}

- (void)applicationDidBecomeActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    [self.secureDelegate show:@"applicationDidBecomeActive:"];
}

Note, I'm using applicationWillResignActive rather than the advised applicationDidEnterBackground, because, as others have pointed out, the latter is not called when double tapping on the home button while the app is running.

I wish I could use notifications to handle all of this, rather than the delegate-protocol pattern, but in my limited testing, the notifications aren't handled in a timely-enough manner, but the above pattern works fine.

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1  
@Tommie Digging around, this bug has been documented on the Dev Forums here and here, so you're not the first person to come across this bug. There's nothing magical about my applicationDidEnterBackground, just obscuring/hiding the confidential information. Seems to work consistently on my iPhone 5, but not work (consistently) on simulator. I've also registered UIApplicationWillResignActiveNotification in view controller, and that behaved the same way (fine on device, not on simulator). –  Rob Sep 24 '13 at 15:51
4  
Note that, as mentioned here stackoverflow.com/questions/18937313/… the behaviour is not always the same in the simulator as on the device! –  Michael Forrest Oct 25 '13 at 21:55
2  
For what it's worth, the ignoreSnapshotOnNextApplicationLaunch method is ignored if it is not invoked during state restoration, as described here. –  Charles A. Jan 20 at 22:26
2  
You don't need to do it in applicationWillResignActive because the screenshot isn't taken until applicationDidEnterBackground. When you double-tap the home button, no screen shot is taken; the screen you are seeing is live. Add an animation to your screen to verify, e.g. cycle background colors. If you then pick another app, your applicationDidEnterBackground will get called before the actual screenshot is taken. –  honus Feb 20 at 19:54
1  
ignoreSnapshotOnNextApplicationLaunch seems to do what it sounds like: prevent a screenshot from being displayed during application launch. It doesn't affect the multitasking UI screenshot, or if your application is being resumed rather than launched. –  Glenn Maynard May 29 at 17:25

This is the solution I worked with for my application:

As Tommy said: You can use the applicationWillResignActive. What I did was making a UIImageView with my SplashImage and add it as subview to my main window-

(void)applicationWillResignActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    imageView = [[UIImageView alloc]initWithFrame:[self.window frame]];
    [imageView setImage:[UIImage imageNamed:@"Portrait(768x1024).png"]];
    [self.window addSubview:imageView];
}

I used this method instead of applicationDidEnterBackground because applicationDidEnterBackground won't be triggered if you doubletap the home button, and applicationWillResignActive will be. I heard people say though it can be triggered in other cases aswell, so I'm still testing around to see if it gives problem, but none so far! ;)

Here to remove the imageview:

- (void)applicationDidBecomeActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    if(imageView != nil) {
        [imageView removeFromSuperview];
        imageView = nil;
    }
}

Hope this helps!

Sidenote: I tested this on both the simulator and a real device: It Won't Show on the simulator, but it does on a real device!

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There is one drawback: applicationWillResignActive is called, amongst other cases, when the user pulls down the notifications dock. So you slide your finger from top downwards and see that image, while you've expected to see app contents. –  Kirill Gamazkov Apr 18 at 14:31
2  
It's better to blur sensitive information on applicationWillResignActive and set imageView on aplicationDidEnterBackground –  Kirill Gamazkov Apr 18 at 14:41
    
This works, but there's a rotation bug when deployed to iOS7, built with xCode6: stackoverflow.com/questions/26147068/… –  Alex Stone Oct 2 at 15:14
    
If I write code you mentioned in applicationWillResignActive, then what will I see when I bring my App back to foreground state ? Will I see "Portrait(768x1024).png" image or actual screen ? –  Pratik Dec 3 at 9:31
1  
@Pratik: You will see the image, unless you remove it again in the applicationDidBecomeActive method (see above). –  Laura yesterday

This quick and easy method will yield a black snapshot above your app's icon in the iOS7 or iOS8 app switcher.

First, take your app's key window (typically setup in AppDelegate.m in application:didFinishLaunchingWithOptions), and hide it when your app is about to move into the background:

- (void)applicationWillResignActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    if(isIOS7Or8)
    {
        self.window.hidden = YES;
    }
}

Then, un-hide your app's key window when your app becomes active again:

- (void)applicationDidBecomeActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    if(isIOS7Or8)
    {
        self.window.hidden = NO;
    }
}

At this point, check out the app switcher and verify that you see a black snapshot above your app's icon. I've noticed that if you launch the app switcher immediately after moving your app into the background, there can be a delay of ~5 seconds where you'll see a snapshot of your app (the one you want to hide!), after which it transitions to an all-black snapshot. I'm not sure what's up with the delay; if anyone has any suggestions, please chime in.

If you want a color other than black in the switcher, you could do something like this by adding a subview with any background color you'd like:

- (void)applicationWillResignActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    if(isIOS7Or8)
    {
        UIView *colorView = [[[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:self.window.frame] autorelease];
        colorView.tag = 9999;
        colorView.backgroundColor = [UIColor purpleColor];
        [self.window addSubview:colorView];
        [self.window bringSubviewToFront:colorView];
    }
}

Then, remove this color subview when your app becomes active again:

- (void)applicationDidBecomeActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    if(isIOS7Or8)
    {
        UIView *colorView = [self.window viewWithTag:9999];
        [colorView removeFromSuperview];
    }
}
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Is there any way to change the black snapshot to another solid color? –  SAHM Oct 24 at 3:21
    
@JPK - I added an example of how you could do this. –  John Jacecko Oct 25 at 7:00

Providing my own solution as an "answers", though this solution is very unreliable. Sometimes i get a black screen as the screenshot, sometimes the XIB and sometimes a screenshot from the app itself. Depending on device and/or if i run this in the simulator.

Please note i cannot provide any code for this solution since it's a lot of app-specific details in there. But this should explain the basic gist of my solution.

In AppDelegate.m under applicationWillResignActive i check if we're running iOS7, if we do i load a new view which is empty with the app-logo in the middle. Once applicationDidBecomeActive is called i re-launch my old views, which will be reset - but that works for the type of application i'm developing.

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1  
If you see what the Camera app does - it transitions the image into a blurred one when going into the background (you can see the transition as it reduces to the icon) –  Petesh Sep 23 '13 at 13:31
    
@Petesh Yes, that's a nice implementation, but the question is how they do it. I fear a private API. –  Rob Sep 24 '13 at 15:32
    
@Tommie You say "Depending on device and/or if i run this in the simulator". For me, it appears to work on the device (though I haven't done exhaustive testing), but not the simulator. Are you finding it doesn't work on device? –  Rob Sep 24 '13 at 15:51

You can use activator to configure double clicking of home button to launch multitasking and disable default double clicking of home button and launching of multitasking window. This method can be used to change the screenshots to the application's default image. This is applicable to apps with default passcode protection feature.

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if only use [self.window addSubview:imageView]; in applicationWillResignActive function, This imageView won't cover UIAlertView, UIActionSheet or MFMailComposeViewController...

Best solution is

- (void)applicationWillResignActive:(UIApplication *)application
{
    UIWindow *mainWindow = [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] windows] lastObject];
    [mainWindow addSubview:imageView];
}
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