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I'm trying to implement a Moose::Role class that behaves like an abstract class would in Java. I'd like to implement some methods in the Role, but then have the ability to override those methods in concrete classes. If I try this using the same style that works when I extend classes I get the error Cannot add an override method if a local method is already present. Here's an example:

My abstract class:

package AbstractClass;

use Moose::Role;

sub my_ac_sub {

    my $self = shift;

    print "In AbstractClass!\n";
    return;
}

1;

My concrete class:

package Class;

use Moose;

with 'AbstractClass';

override 'my_ac_sub' => sub {

    my $self = shift;

    super;
    print "In Class!\n";
    return;
};

__PACKAGE__->meta->make_immutable;
1;

And then:

use Class;

my $class = Class->new;
$class->my_ac_sub;

Am I doing something wrong? Is what I'm trying to accomplish supposed to be done a different way? Is what I'm trying to do not supposed to be done at all?

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Use an abstract class to model an abstract class! This simply requires you to make construction impossible (i.e. provide a BUILDALL that throws an error). –  amon Sep 23 '13 at 12:56
1  
Probably the Moose way of doing this is to have requires 'my_ac_sub'; in the Role, not the "virtual" method. Moose::Role will then check it has been composed into a class with the method available, –  Neil Slater Sep 23 '13 at 12:59
    
I've tried running the code and then replacing override by just sub my_ac_sub and suddenly it worked just as expected. Is there anything wrong with that "fix"? (Disclaimer: I'm new to Moose). –  Dallaylaen Sep 23 '13 at 13:09
    
Nothing, except the base class is no longer providing an "abstract" method. It's just a regular base class, is that what you are looking for? –  Neil Slater Sep 23 '13 at 13:15
1  
And it's a performance hit in all descendant classes, too. I'm willing to see a real solution. –  Dallaylaen Sep 23 '13 at 13:51
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Turns out I was using it incorrectly. I opened a ticket and was shown the correct way of doing this:

package Class;

use Moose;

with 'AbstractClass';

around 'my_ac_sub' => sub {

    my $next = shift;
    my $self = shift;

    $self->$next();
    print "In Class!\n";
    return;
};

__PACKAGE__->meta->make_immutable;
1;

Making this change has the desired effect.

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Some time ago, I did this by having a role that consists solely of requires statements. That forms the abstract base class. Then, you can put your default implementations in another class and inherit from that:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use 5.014;

package AbstractClass;

use Moose::Role;

requires 'my_virtual_method_this';
requires 'my_virtual_method_that';

package DefaultImpl;

use Moose;
with 'AbstractClass';

sub my_virtual_method_this {
    say 'this';
}

sub my_virtual_method_that {
    say 'that'
}

package MyImpl;

use Moose;
extends 'DefaultImpl';
with 'AbstractClass';

override my_virtual_method_that => sub {
    super;
    say '... and the other';
};

package main;

my $x = MyImpl->new;

$x->my_virtual_method_this;
$x->my_virtual_method_that;

If you want to provide default implementations for only a few methods define in the role, remove the requires from DefaultImpl.

Output:

$ ./zpx.pl
this
that
... and the other
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1  
I think this is a good work around. It doesn't "feel clean", but I'll submit a wishlist enhancement for this. Thank you for this answer. –  Joel Sep 25 '13 at 13:12
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