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Clarification of 'map' or 'ordering' at bottom of post

Imagine we have a data frame with several logical columns, and a 'map' which, for specific combinations of those logical columns, gives a value.

What is the best/most efficient way to compute the value associated with each row of the data frame.

I have three possible solutions below: ifelse(), merge() and table(). I'd appreciate any comments or alternative solutions.

[Apologies, a rather long post]

Consider the following example data frame:

# Generate example
#N <- 15
#Data <- data.frame(A=sample(c(FALSE,TRUE),N,TRUE,c(8,2)),
#               B=sample(c(FALSE,TRUE),N,TRUE,c(6,4)),
#               C=sample(c(FALSE,TRUE),N,TRUE,c(7,3)),
#               D=sample(c(FALSE,TRUE),N,TRUE,c(7,3)))

# Specific example used in this question
Data <- structure(list(A = c(FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE,
  FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE),
  B = c(FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, TRUE, FALSE,
  FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE), C = c(FALSE,
  FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE,
  FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE), D = c(TRUE, FALSE, FALSE,
  FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, TRUE, FALSE,
  FALSE, TRUE, FALSE)), .Names = c("A", "B", "C", "D"), 
  class = "data.frame", row.names   = c(NA,-15L))


        A     B     C     D
 1  FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
 2  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
 3  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE
 4   TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE
 5  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
 6  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE
 7  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE
 8  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
 9  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
 10  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
 11 FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
 12 FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
 13 FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE
 14 FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
 15 FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE

Combined with the following map:

# A -> B -> C                                                                                                                                                                                                        
#   \_  D  

### To clarify, if someone has both B & D TRUE (with C FALSE), D is higher than B
### i.e. there can be no ties

This defines an ordering of the logical columns. The final value I want is the 'highest' column within each row. Such that, if column C is true we return C always. We only return "D" if C is FALSE and D is true.

The naive way to do this would be nested ifelse statements:

Data$Highest <- with(Data, ifelse( C, "C",
                                  ifelse( D, "D",
                                         ifelse( B, "B",
                                                ifelse( A, "A", "none")
                                                )
                                         )
                                  )
                     )

But that code is difficult to read/maintain and gets very complicated for complex orderings with many columns.

I can quickly generate a mapping from the column combinations to the desired output:

Map <- expand.grid( lapply( lapply( Data[c("A","B","C","D")], unique ), sort ) )

Map$Value <- factor(NA, levels=c("A","B","C","D","none"))
Map$Value[which(Map$A)] <- "A"
Map$Value[which(Map$B)] <- "B"
Map$Value[which(Map$D)] <- "D"
Map$Value[which(Map$C)] <- "C"
Map$Value[which(is.na(Map$Value))] <- "none"

        A     B     C     D Value
 1  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  none
 2   TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE     A
 3  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE     B
 4   TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE     B
 5  FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE     C
 6   TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE     C
 7  FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE     C
 8   TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE     C
 9  FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE     D
 10  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE     D
 11 FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE     D
 12  TRUE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE     D
 13 FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE     C
 14  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE     C
 15 FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE     C
 16  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE     C

Which can be used with merge():

merge( Data, Map, by=c("A","B","C","D"), all.y=FALSE )

        A     B     C     D Highest Value
 1  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE    none  none
 2  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE    none  none
 3  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE    none  none
 4  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE    none  none
 5  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE    none  none
 6  FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE       D     D
 7  FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE       D     D
 8  FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE       C     C
 9  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE       B     B
 10 FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE       B     B
 11 FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE       B     B
 12 FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE       B     B
 13 FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE       D     D
 14  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE       A     A
 15  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE       C     C

However, the merge() function does not currently preserve the row order. There are ways round this though.

My final idea was to use a 4-dimensional table with character entries corresponding to the map:

Map2 <- table( lapply( Data[c("A","B","C","D")], unique ) )

Map2[] <- "none"
Map2["TRUE",,,] <- "A"
Map2[,"TRUE",,] <- "B"
Map2[,,,"TRUE"] <- "D"
Map2[,,"TRUE",] <- "C"

But I find the above lines unclear (perhaps there is a better way to make the table? I thought it would be possible to turn Map into Map2, but I couldn't see how).

We then use matrix-indexing to pull out the corresponding value:

BOB <- as.matrix(Data[c("A","B","C","D")])
cBOB <- matrix(as.character(BOB),nrow=NROW(BOB),ncol=NCOL(BOB),dimnames=dimnames(BOB))

Data$Alt.Highest <- Map2[cBOB]


        A     B     C     D Highest Alt.Highest
 1  FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE       D           D
 2  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE    none        none
 3  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE       B           B
 4   TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE       A           A
 5  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE    none        none
 6  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE       B           B
 7  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE       B           B
 8  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE    none        none
 9  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE    none        none
 10  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE       C           C
 11 FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE       D           D
 12 FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE       C           C
 13 FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE       B           B
 14 FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE       D           D
 15 FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE    none        none

So in summary, is there a better way to achieve this 'mapping' type operation and any thoughts on the efficiency of these methods?

For the application I'm interested in, I have nine columns and an ordering chart with three branches to apply to 3000 rows. Essentially I am trying to construct a factor based on an awkward data storage format. So clarity of code is my first priority, with speed/memory efficiency my second.

Thanks in advance.

P.S. Suggestions for amending the question title also welcome.

Clarification

The real application involves a questionnaire with 9 questions asking whether the respondent has achieved a given education/qualification level. These are binary yes/no responses.

What we want is to generate a new variable 'highest qualification achieved'.

The problem is that the 9 levels don't form a simple stack. For example, professional qualifications can be achieved without going to university (especially in older respondents).

We have designed an 'map' or 'ordering' such that, for every combination of responses we have a 'highest qualification' (this order is subjective, hence the desire to make it simple to implement alternative orders).

# So given the nine responses: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I
# we define an ordering as:
# D > C > B > A
# F > E
# E > A
# E == B
# I > H
# H == B
# G == B

# which has a set of order relationships. There is equality in this example

#    A -> B -> C -> D
#      \_ E -> F
#      \_ H -> I
#      \_ G

# 0  1    2    3    4     
# We could then have five levels in out final 'highest' ordered factor: none, 1, 2, 3, 4   

# Or we could decide to add more levels to break certain ties.

The R question is, given an ordering (and what to do with ties) that map combinations of the logical columns to a 'highest achieved' value. How best to implement this in R.

share|improve this question
    
FYI, "Map" is already an R function. –  Frank Sep 23 '13 at 17:21
    
@Frank, good spot. So 'mapping' probably is not the word I want. –  Simon Sep 24 '13 at 10:01
    
No, I guess it is; I just mean that you don't want to give names to your R objects that are already in use. –  Frank Sep 24 '13 at 11:45
1  
@Frank... you're right of course, bad practice. I mis-understood your point at first. I find it funny that after 5+ years of using R I still find functions in base that I've never heard of. Also ruins my scheme of always starting user objects with a capital letter to avoid this. –  Simon Sep 24 '13 at 15:08
    
Yeah, I was surprised to find that anything in base R started with capitals, too. If you look at ?Map, you'll see a few more. Maybe they wanted to use the exact names from that Map-Reduce approach I've heard of or something. –  Frank Sep 24 '13 at 15:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think I might not understand your concept of 'ordering'. If it is the case that no ties are allowed, and you know exactly how each letter compares to all others, that means that there is a strict ordering, that can be broken down into a simple vector from highest to lowest. If this isn't true, then maybe you could give a more difficult example. If it is true, then you could code this quite easily like:

order<-c('C','D','B','A')
reordered.Data<-Data[order]
Data$max<-
  c(order,'none')[apply(reordered.Data,1,function(x) min(which(c(x,TRUE))))]

#        A     B     C     D  max
# 1  FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE    D
# 2  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE none
# 3  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE    B
# 4   TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE    A
# 5  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE none
# 6  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE    B
# 7  FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE    B
# 8  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE none
# 9  FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE none
# 10  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE    C
# 11 FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE    D
# 12 FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE    C
# 13 FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE    B
# 14 FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE    D
# 15 FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE none

I think I now understand your concept of 'ordering'. However, I think that you can safely ignore it at first. For example, G is the same level as B. But G and B will never be compared; you can only have one of {B,E,H,G}. So, as long as each "branch" is in the correct order, it won't matter. If you provided some sample data for your new branching, I could test this, but try something like this:

order<-c(D,C,F,I,B,E,H,G,A)
levs<-c(4,3,3,3,2,2,2,2,1)
names(levs)<-order
reordered.Data<-Data[order]
Data$max<-
  c(order,'none')[apply(reordered.Data,1,function(x) min(which(c(x,TRUE))))]
Data$lev<-levs[Data$max]
share|improve this answer
    
Have tried to clarify 'ordering' in the question. However, I do like your answer... it is especially clean if there can be no ties as in my situation - more generally, with ties this method wouldn't work. What makes it nice is that to change the 'map' you need only change the order vector. –  Simon Sep 24 '13 at 10:03
    
@Simon Check my update. I think you can safely ignore the 'equalities', because those values will never be compared. –  nograpes Sep 24 '13 at 14:38

Here's a data.table approach:

require(data.table)
DT <- data.table(Data)

valord <- c('none','A','B','D','C')
DT[,val:={
    vals <- c('none'=TRUE,unlist(.SD))[valord]
    names(vals)[max(which(vals))]
},by=1:nrow(DT)]

The result is

        A     B     C     D  val
 1: FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE    D
 2: FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE none
 3: FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE    B
 4:  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE    A
 5: FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE none
 6: FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE    B
 7: FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE    B
 8: FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE none
 9: FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE none
10:  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE    C
11: FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE    D
12: FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE    C
13: FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE    B
14: FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE    D
15: FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE none

If you run

class(DT) # [1] "data.table" "data.frame"

you'll see that this is a data.frame, like your "Data," and the same functions can be applied to it.

share|improve this answer
    
As written, this is not quite correct. Given the 'ordering' C > D, so there should be two 'C's in the val column. Using @nograpes answer (i.e. reordering the columns) would make this work I think. However, I'm not very familiar with data.table. So I won't make this answer down on clarity of code (just because I don't understand it). –  Simon Sep 24 '13 at 10:11
    
@Simon Okay, thanks. I didn't realize that you were not following an alphabetical order. As far as the equality thing goes, I would suggest making a new SO question. My approach would be to make a new variable and map it to those "levels" you mention, something like this: stackoverflow.com/questions/8057113/… –  Frank Sep 24 '13 at 11:43
1  
That's ok. I have accepted the other answer purely on the fact that I'm not (currently) familiar with data.table. Thanks for your answer though, something to consider when I get round to data.table. –  Simon Sep 24 '13 at 15:11

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