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This is perhaps a very simple question.

I have a very basic query in Excel that pulls in some values from a db on Sql Server 2008 R2.

The date fields in this db are stored as datetime. In this query, I am uninterested in the time part, and so only want to select the date. I have tried using Cast or Convert, however both return the date in sql (yyyy-mm-dd) to Excel. Excel recognizes this as text rather than a date, and so I am unable to do date filters in my table once the data is in Excel.

If I do datepart() in Excel, it shows it as a date and I can filter as expected, however I want the data coming directly from the query to return as a date value that Excel can filter on.

Below is my sample query:

SELECT order_header.oh_id, 
order_header.oh_order_number, 
order_header.oh_datetime, 
convert(date, order_header.oh_datetime, 103) as 'ConvertOrderDate',
cast(order_header.oh_datetime as date) as 'CastOrderDate'
FROM order_header
WHERE order_header.oh_datetime >= '2013-09-01'

When returning this to Excel, this is what is being returned:

Output Image

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where you convert/cast to date try changing it to datetime –  T I Sep 23 '13 at 13:54
1  
I hate Excel's date recognition: it seems to always guess wrong. If I want text or numeric, it will think it's a date. If I want a date, it won't see it. –  Joel Coehoorn Sep 23 '13 at 15:19

1 Answer 1

I have actually found the answer without doing anything weird :)

SELECT order_header.oh_id, 
order_header.oh_order_number, 
order_header.oh_datetime, 
DATEADD(dd, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, order_header.oh_datetime), 0) as 'OrderDate'
FROM order_header
WHERE order_header.oh_datetime >= '2011-09-01'

This returns as a datetime but with 00:00 in the time, so I can simply format this out in Excel.

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