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Given the following code (that doesn't work):

while True:
    #snip: print out current state
    while True:
        ok = get_input("Is this ok? (y/n)")
        if ok == "y" or ok == "Y": break 2 #this doesn't work :(
        if ok == "n" or ok == "N": break
    #do more processing with menus and stuff

Is there a way to make this work? Or do I have do one check to break out of the input loop, then another, more limited, check in the outside loop to break out all together if the user is satisfied?

Edit-FYI: get_input is a short function I wrote that supports showing a prompt and default values and all that fanciness and returns stdin.readline().strip()

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17  
If only Python had support for Goto. It's not that bad if used in moderation. –  Kibbee Oct 10 '08 at 0:08
3  
Exceptions are NOT goto, unless this is some strange Python idiom I have yet to learn... –  Matthew Scharley Oct 10 '08 at 0:17
    
@monoxide: Exceptions seem to behave a bit like a specialized goto that jumps out of the normal execution to the containing try block. Feels a little like a goto to me. –  S.Lott Oct 10 '08 at 0:37
9  
Why doesn't Python just have 'break(n)' where n is the number of levels you want to break out of. –  Nathan May 2 '10 at 16:49
4  
"Specialised GOTO" == oxymoron. If it's specialised, it's a control structure by definition. –  detly Jul 3 '10 at 16:09

16 Answers 16

up vote 129 down vote accepted

My first instinct would be to refactor the nested loop into a function and use return to break out.

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2  
This is another thought I had, since a get_input_yn() function would be useful elsewhere too, I'm sure. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 10 '08 at 0:28
7  
+1. This is a good and Pythonic approach :) –  Dan Oct 10 '08 at 0:46
10  
agreed in this specific case, but in the general case of 'I have nested loops, what do I do' refactoring may not make sense. –  quick_dry Oct 10 '08 at 1:11
    
using an exception may be easier when you must yield instead of using return, however you probably should be using itertools.islice() in such a case. –  robert king Feb 13 '12 at 3:53
1  
Its usually possible to refactor the inner loop into its own method, that returns true to continue, false to break the outer loop. while condition1: / if not MyLoop2(params): break. An alternative is to set a boolean flag, that is tested at both levels. more = True / while condition1 and more: / while condition2 and more: / if stopCondition: more = False / break / ... –  ToolmakerSteve Nov 22 '13 at 19:44

PEP 3136 proposes labeled break/continue. Guido rejected it because "code so complicated to require this feature is very rare". The PEP does mention some workarounds, though (such as the exception technique), while Guido feels refactoring to use return will be simpler in most cases.

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7  
Although, refactor/return is usually the way to go, I've seen quite a few cases where a simple concise ‘break 2’ statement would just make so much sense. Also, refactor/return doesn't work the same for continue. In these cases, numeric break and continue would be easier to follow and less cluttered than refactoring to a tiny function, raising exceptions, or convoluted logic involving setting a flag to break at each nest level. It's a shame Guido rejected it. –  James Haigh Jul 11 '13 at 18:29
2  
break; break would be nice. –  PyRulez Jul 17 '13 at 21:13

First, ordinary logic is helpful.

If, for some reason, the terminating conditions can't be worked out, exceptions are a fall-back plan.

 class GetOutOfLoop( Exception ):
     pass

try:
    done= False
    while not done:
        isok= False
        while not (done or isok):
            ok = get_input("Is this ok? (y/n)")
            if ok in ("y", "Y") or ok in ("n", "N") : 
                done= True # probably better
                raise GetOutOfLoop
        # other stuff
except GetOutOfLoop:
    pass

For this specific example, an exception may not be necessary.

On other other hand, we often have "Y", "N" and "Q" options in character-mode applications. For the "Q" option, we want an immediate exit. That's more exceptional.

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I only started learning python last night, so apologies in advance for not thinking of stuff like "ok in...". some good suggestions here, but is an exception really necessary here? There's nothing too exceptional about a user accepting input. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 10 '08 at 0:15
    
Surely that code needs an "except" clause. –  Robert Rossney Oct 10 '08 at 0:28
    
@monoxide - It's an exception to assumption that the user will enter a bad answer. Really, Python exceptions are cheap and useful. Don't be shy! –  Kirk Strauser Oct 10 '08 at 1:50
2  
Seriously, exceptions are extremely cheap and idiomatic python uses lots and lots of them. It's very easy to define and throw custom ones, as well. –  Gregg Lind Oct 21 '08 at 20:56
    
Interesting idea. I'm torn as to whether to love it or hate it. –  Craig McQueen Jan 25 '10 at 2:54

First, you may also consider making the process of getting and validating the input a function; within that function, you can just return the value if its correct, and keep spinning in the while loop if not. This essentially obviates the problem you solved, and can usually be applied in the more general case (breaking out of multiple loops). If you absolutely must keep this structure in your code, and really don't want to deal with bookkeeping booleans...

You may also use goto in the following way (using an April Fools module from here):

#import the stuff
from goto import goto, label

while True:
    #snip: print out current state
    while True:
        ok = get_input("Is this ok? (y/n)")
        if ok == "y" or ok == "Y": goto .breakall
        if ok == "n" or ok == "N": break
    #do more processing with menus and stuff
label .breakall

I know, I know, "thou shalt not use goto" and all that, but it works well in strange cases like this.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm at college at the moment, quickly (since goto's not in the module index), what is comefrom for? –  Matthew Scharley Oct 10 '08 at 0:20
1  
If it is anything like the COME FROM command in INTERCAL, then nothing –  1800 INFORMATION Oct 10 '08 at 0:28
    
comefrom in Python allows you to redirect the running program to a different place whenever it reaches a certain label. There's more info here (entrian.com/goto) –  Matt J Oct 10 '08 at 0:30
    
In other words, it's a really bad idea unless you love your spaghetti code. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 10 '08 at 0:36
4  
I think it's a clean and readable enough solution to qualify as good code, so I vote it up. :) –  J.T. Hurley Jan 9 '09 at 20:28

Here's another approach that is short. The disadvantage is that you can only break the outer loop, but sometimes it's exactly what you want.

for a in xrange(10):
    for b in xrange(20):
        if something(a, b):
            # Break the inner loop...
            break
    else:
        # Continue if the inner loop wasn't broken.
        continue
    # Inner loop was broken, break the outer.
    break
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work if the inner loop is infinite, e.g. for x in itertools.count(1): .... –  eugene y Mar 23 at 23:12

I tend to agree that refactoring into a function is usually the best approach for this sort of situation, but for when you really need to break out of nested loops, here's an interesting variant of the exception-raising approach that @S.Lott described. It uses Python's with statement to make the exception raising look a bit nicer. Define a new context manager (you only have to do this once) with:

from contextlib import contextmanager
@contextmanager
def nested_break():
    class NestedBreakException(Exception):
        pass
    try:
        yield NestedBreakException
    except NestedBreakException:
        pass

Now you can use this context manager as follows:

with nested_break() as mylabel:
    while True:
        print "current state"
        while True:
            ok = raw_input("Is this ok? (y/n)")
            if ok == "y" or ok == "Y": raise mylabel
            if ok == "n" or ok == "N": break
        print "more processing"

Advantages: (1) it's slightly cleaner (no explicit try-except block), and (2) you get a custom-built Exception subclass for each use of nested_break; no need to declare your own Exception subclass each time.

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Introduce a new variable that you'll use as a 'loop breaker'. First assign something to it(False,0, etc.), and then, inside the outer loop, before you break from it, change the value to something else(True,1,...). Once the loop exits make the 'parent' loop check for that value. Let me demonstrate:

breaker = False #our mighty loop exiter!
while True:
    while True:
        if conditionMet:
            #insert code here...
            breaker = True 
            break
    if breaker: # the interesting part!
        break   # <--- !

If you have an infinite loop, this is the only way out; for other loops execution is really a lot faster. This also works if you have many nested loops. You can exit all, or just a few. Endless possibilities! Hope this helped!

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keeplooping=True
while keeplooping:
    #Do Stuff
    while keeplooping:
          #do some other stuff
          if finisheddoingstuff(): keeplooping=False

or something like that. You could set a variable in the inner loop, and check it in the outer loop immediately after the inner loop exits, breaking if appropriate. I kinda like the GOTO method, provided you don't mind using an April Fool's joke module - its not Pythonic, but it does make sense.

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This isn't the prettiest way to do it, but in my opinion, it's the best way.

def loop():
    while True:
    #snip: print out current state
        while True:
            ok = get_input("Is this ok? (y/n)")
            if ok == "y" or ok == "Y": return
            if ok == "n" or ok == "N": break
        #do more processing with menus and stuff

I'm pretty sure you could work out something using recursion here as well, but I dunno if that's a good option for you.

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Factor your loop logic into an iterator that yields the loop variables and returns when done -- here is a simple one that lays out images in rows/columns until we're out of images or out of places to put them:

def it(rows, cols, images):
    i = 0
    for r in xrange(rows):
        for c in xrange(cols):
            if i >= len(images):
                return
            yield r, c, images[i]
            i += 1 

for r, c, image in it(rows=4, cols=4, images=['a.jpg', 'b.jpg', 'c.jpg']):
    ... do something with r, c, image ...

This has the advantage of splitting up the complicated loop logic and the processing...

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And why not to keep looping if two conditions are true? I think this is a more pythonic way:

dejaVu = True

while dejaVu:
    while True:
        ok = raw_input("Is this ok? (y/n)")
        if ok == "y" or ok == "Y" or ok == "n" or ok == "N":
            dejaVu = False
            break

Isn't it?

All the best.

share|improve this answer
    
why not just while dejaVu:? You set it to true anyway. –  Matthew Scharley Nov 6 '12 at 23:23
    
hey that works! I was thinking in two True conditions to skip two loops, but just one is enough. –  Mauro Aspé Nov 7 '12 at 9:59

My reason for coming here is that i had an outer loop and an inner loop like so:

for x in array:
  for y in dont_use_these_values:
    if x.value==y:
      array.pop(x)
      continue

  do some other stuff with x

As you can see, it won't actually go to the next x, but will go to the next y instead.

what i found to solve this simply was to run through the array twice instead:

for x in array:
  for y in dont_use_these_values:
    if x.value==y:
      array.pop(x)
      continue

for x in array:
  do some other stuff with x

I know this was a specific case of OP's question, but I am posting it in the hope that it will help someone think about their problem differently while keeping things simple.

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Try using an infinite generator.

from itertools import repeat
inputs = (get_input("Is this ok? (y/n)") for _ in repeat(None))
response = (i.lower()=="y" for i in inputs if i.lower() in ("y", "n"))

while True:
    #snip: print out current state
    if next(response):
        break
    #do more processing with menus and stuff
share|improve this answer
break_levels = 0
while True:
    # snip: print out current state
    while True:
        ok = get_input("Is this ok? (y/n)")
        if ok == "y" or ok == "Y":
            break_levels = 1        # how far nested, excluding this break
            break
        if ok == "n" or ok == "N":
            break                   # normal break
    if break_levels:
        break_levels -= 1
        break                       # pop another level
if break_levels:
    break_levels -= 1
    break

# ...and so on
share|improve this answer
    
This one uses a level counter to break up a number of levels –  RufusVS Jun 13 '13 at 17:16

Similar like the one before, but more compact. (Booleans are just numbers)

breaker = False #our mighty loop exiter!
while True:
    while True:
        ok = get_input("Is this ok? (y/n)")
        breaker+= (ok.lower() == "y")
        break

    if breaker: # the interesting part!
        break   # <--- !
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  Austin Henley Oct 19 '12 at 21:20
1  
This looks pretty ugly and makes the code harder to understand, as compared to the previous one. Also, It's wrong. It misses out on actually checking if the input is acceptable and breaks after 1 loop. –  Eric Dec 30 '12 at 16:01
break_label = None
while True:
    # snip: print out current state
    while True:
        ok = get_input("Is this ok? (y/n)")
        if ok == "y" or ok == "Y":
            break_label = "outer"   # specify label to break to
            break
        if ok == "n" or ok == "N":
            break
    if break_label:
        if break_label != "inner":
            break                   # propagate up
        break_label = None          # we have arrived!
if break_label:
    if break_label != "outer":
        break                       # propagate up
    break_label = None              # we have arrived!

#do more processing with menus and stuff
share|improve this answer
    
this one breaks up to a certain "label" –  RufusVS Jun 13 '13 at 17:17

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