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Can sommebody please tell me what is not right about this code? It compiles and everything great but the output is solid zero's all the way down. So it is not counting the letters.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

const char FileName[] = "c:/test.txt";

int main () 
{
    string lineBuffer;
    ifstream inMyStream (FileName); //open my file stream


    if (inMyStream.is_open()) 
    {
       //create an array to hold the letter counts
       int upperCaseCount[26] = {0};
           int lowerCaseCount[26] = {0};

       //read the text file
       while (!inMyStream.eof() )
       {
    	   //get a line of text
           getline (inMyStream, lineBuffer);
           //read through each letter in the lineBuffer
           char oneLetter;
           for( int n=0; n < (int)lineBuffer.length(); ++n )
    	   {
    		 oneLetter = char( lineBuffer[n] ); //get a letter
                if (oneLetter >= 'A' && oneLetter <='Z') 
    			{ //decide if it is a capital letter
                     upperCaseCount[int(oneLetter)- 65]++; //make the index match the count array
                         if (oneLetter >= 'a' && oneLetter <='z') 
    					 { //decide if it is a lower letter
                               lowerCaseCount[int(oneLetter)- 65]++; //make the index match the count array
                         }//end 
                }//end
    	   }
        }//end of while

        inMyStream.close(); //close the file stream

        //display the counts
        for (int i= 0; i < 26; i++)
            cout << char(i + 65) << "\t\t" << lowerCaseCount[i] << char(i + 95) << "\t\t" << lowerCaseCount[i] << endl;
}//end of if
        else cout << "File Error: Open Failed";

       return 0;
}
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1  
Have you tried running your program in a debugger and watch step by step what actually happens? –  Georg Fritzsche Dec 13 '09 at 13:39
    
No I don't know how to do that. –  LilProblems Dec 13 '09 at 13:42
    
What operating system and what development enviroment are you using? –  Georg Fritzsche Dec 13 '09 at 13:44
    
I have Visual Studio 2008 and I am running Vista –  LilProblems Dec 13 '09 at 13:46
1  
@LilProblems: try to get into debugging, it will really help you in the long run. see e.g. this tutorial (page 9 ff.): cs.armstrong.edu/liang/cpp/supplement/… –  Georg Fritzsche Dec 13 '09 at 13:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You just have your if statement scoping wrong here. Each letter can be either uppercase or lowercase, but the way your if statements are scoped, you're only checking for lowercase if the letter is already uppercase, which of course is nonsensical.

You want something more like:

for(unsigned n = 0; n < lineBuffer.length(); ++n)
{
   oneLetter = char( lineBuffer[n] ); // get a letter
   if (oneLetter >= 'A' && oneLetter <='Z') {
     upperCaseCount[int(oneLetter)- 'A']++;
   }
   else if (oneLetter >= 'a' && oneLetter <='z') { 
     lowerCaseCount[int(oneLetter)- 'a']++;
   }
}
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Thanks guys works perfect like a charm You all are wonderful. Hang around I 've got two more assignments due by the end of tonight. LOL! –  LilProblems Dec 13 '09 at 13:54

You've gotten some help with the problem you knew you had, now perhaps a bit with one you may not realize you have (yet):

   while (!inMyStream.eof() )
   {
       //get a line of text
       getline (inMyStream, lineBuffer);

One thing you should learn right away is that as you've written it, this won't work correctly. What you normally want to do is:

while (getline(inMyStream, lineBuffer)) {
    // .. the rest of the processing.

However, since you're only processing one character at a time, and ignoring everything but letters, it would probably be simpler to only read one character at a time:

int ch;
while (inMyStream >> ch)
// process the character

Since nobody else has mentioned them, I'll also point out that instead of explicitly testing against 'a' and 'z' to find lowercase letters, and 'A' and 'Z' to find upper case, you'd be better off using islower and isupper, which are supplied in <ctype.h> (among a couple of other places):

#include <ctype.h>

while (inMyStream >> ch)
    if (isupper((unsigned char)ch))
        ++upperCount[(unsigned char)ch-'A'];
    else if (islower((unsigned char)ch))
        ++lowerCount[(unsigned char)ch-'a'];
share|improve this answer
    
In this assignment I was given the code already I just had to modify it to count lowercase as well as uppercase.We are not supposed to change any of the code that was given. I know - that sucks huh? –  LilProblems Dec 13 '09 at 18:57
    
Pity you couldn't change code, because it would certainly be a lot simpler to have one loop that creates counts for all characters, then just print out the upper and lower case letters. Try it and see how much complexity is removed! –  Tony van der Peet Dec 13 '09 at 22:44

EDIT: Indeed the problem described here is not the only one, see the other answers for more complete solutions.

upperCaseCount[int(oneLetter)- 65]++; //make the index match the count array
                     if (oneLetter >= 'a' && oneLetter <='z') 
                                     { //decide if it is a lower letter
                           lowerCaseCount[int(oneLetter)- 65]++;

(At least) one of these two 65 is wrong. I would recommend int('A') and int('a') instead...

Note: this is probably not what explains your problem.

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Good catch! The lowercase letters start at 97, if I remember correctly. –  Carl Smotricz Dec 13 '09 at 13:45
2  
+1, but it's just 'a' or 'A', no int() around it. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 13 '09 at 13:47
    
Ah, well, he probly means to be casting, i.e. (int) ('A'). –  Carl Smotricz Dec 13 '09 at 14:01
    
I had not noticed the C++ tag so I was aping the syntax of int(oneLetter) nearby. I don't seem to get the hang of C++ casts, though (now that I know it's C++). –  Pascal Cuoq Dec 13 '09 at 14:08
    
The thing is - 'a' is an int with no casts. And conventional C cast is (int)'a' anyway ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 13 '09 at 14:53

Your if concerning upper and lower case letters are incorrectly nested. You don't even look at lowercase letters if oneLetter is not uppercase. Those two ifs should be at the same level.

That's the only error I can see.

I'd recommend either debugging, as gf suggests, or throwing in some print statements to verify your assumptions about what's happening (or not).

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There could be other things wrong with this code, but one thing that stands out is that the if statement that counts the lower case letters is inside the if statement that counts the upper case statement. Your test file probably does not contain any upper case letters, and hence the output is a solid zero.

There should be two separate if statements, like:

if (oneLetter >= 'A' && oneLetter <='Z') 
{ //decide if it is a capital letter
  upperCaseCount[int(oneLetter)- 65]++; //make the index match the count array   
}//end

if (oneLetter >= 'a' && oneLetter <='z') 
{ //decide if it is a lower letter
  lowerCaseCount[int(oneLetter)- 65]++; //make the index match the count array
}//end
share|improve this answer
    
@Faraz:The logic of your second if statement does not match the comment (at least with any character set I know of). You're subtracting 65 whether the letter is upper case or lower case, but 'a' and 'A' clearly don't have the same value... –  Jerry Coffin Dec 13 '09 at 15:46
    
There should be one if statement, use toupper or tolower to convert the character then compare. Also, get rid of the Magic Number 65, replace with 'A'. –  Thomas Matthews Dec 14 '09 at 17:40
    
Edit: My bad, the original post contained two if statements for distinguishing between upper and lower case. I still stand by replacing 65 with 'A' or 'a'. –  Thomas Matthews Dec 14 '09 at 17:43

How about the printout at the end, where lower case letter counts are printed twice? This explains why it's "zeroes all the way down", because the original code was counting the upper case letters correctly wasn't it?

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