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This is my code

foreach (String Email in usersList)
{ 
   if(Regex.IsMatch(Email, @"\w+([-+.']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*") 
   {

     SmtpClient smtpClient = new SmtpClient();
     MailMessage message = new MailMessage();
     MailAddress AddressFrom = new MailAddress(emailFrom);
     message.From = AddressFrom;
     MailAddress AddressTo = new MailAddress(Email);
     message.To.Add(Email);
     smtpClient.Send(message);
     message.Dispose();
     smtpClient.Dispose();
   }
}

I need to send an email to all users present in the list. But if an exception occurs, the loop breaks and the rest of emails won't be sent. There is other way I can do this so if an email can't be sent the loop keeps iterating and just ignore the ones that fail?

Thank you!

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It is rare to call .Dispose directly and be doing things correctly. –  user7116 Sep 23 '13 at 17:47
    
Look into using constructs, also you may want to rethink your email regex...... stackoverflow.com/questions/201323/… –  Arran Sep 23 '13 at 17:48
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, but your code could use a decent amount of work.

using (SmtpClient smtpClient = new SmtpClient())
{

    foreach (String Email in usersList)
    { 
       if(Regex.IsMatch(Email, @"\w+([-+.']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*") 
       {
         using (MailMessage message = new MailMessage())
         {
             try
             {
                 MailAddress AddressFrom = new MailAddress(emailFrom);
                 message.From = AddressFrom;
                 MailAddress AddressTo = new MailAddress(Email);
                 message.To.Add(Email);
                 smtpClient.Send(message);
              }
              catch (Exception e)
              {
                  // log exception and keep going
              }
         }
       }
    }
}

Firstly, stop calling Dispose()! When you get that exception, do you know what happens? Dispose() never gets called. Bring you smtp allocation outside of the loop so it's not re-allocated on every iteration. Then just add a try-catch and suppress the exceptions, log them, write them to the console, whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
You are missing the Send call –  Adrian Carneiro Sep 23 '13 at 17:53
    
@AdrianCarneiro good call, deleted one too many lines. –  evanmcdonnal Sep 23 '13 at 17:53
    
Hey @evanmcdonnal thank you so much!! The problem here was me using Dispose(). And off course, I added try catch too. Thank you! –  Ana Sampaio Sep 23 '13 at 18:12
    
Just one last question, should I never use smtpClient.Dispose()? –  Ana Sampaio Sep 23 '13 at 18:14
1  
@AnaSampaio no, the using statement ensures that Dispose() is called. That's why I added it and removed the Dispose() calls, in general using is preferred to calling Dispose() directly for reasons along the lines of what I mentioned. Here are a couple of useful links if you're want to learn more about it; stackoverflow.com/questions/10984336/… msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yh598w02.aspx –  evanmcdonnal Sep 23 '13 at 18:44
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How about using "try catch", a.k.a. Exception Handling Statements?

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0yd65esw(v=vs.110).aspx

You code would look like this:

//you don't need a SmtpClient for each recipient
SmtpClient smtpClient = new SmtpClient();

foreach (String Email in usersList)
{ 
   if(Regex.IsMatch(Email, @"\w+([-+.']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*") 
   {
     using (MailMessage message = new MailMessage()){
         try
         {
            MailAddress AddressFrom = new MailAddress(emailFrom);
            message.From = AddressFrom;
            MailAddress AddressTo = new MailAddress(Email);
            message.To.Add(Email);
            smtpClient.Send(message);
         } 
         catch (Exception ex)
         {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
         }
     }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is exactly what try/catch blocks are for. –  Ant P Sep 23 '13 at 17:47
1  
Correct answer, but an example snippet of code would make it complete. (preferably mentioning not catching "Exception"!) –  Sayse Sep 23 '13 at 17:48
    
He was just waiting for me to write it so that he can copy paste :P –  evanmcdonnal Sep 23 '13 at 17:54
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How about Parallel programming?

Parallel.ForEach(usersList, (string email) =>
{ 
   if(Regex.IsMatch(Email, @"\w+([-+.']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*") 
   {
     SmtpClient smtpClient = new SmtpClient();
     MailMessage message = new MailMessage();
     MailAddress AddressFrom = new MailAddress(emailFrom);
     message.From = AddressFrom;
     MailAddress AddressTo = new MailAddress(Email);
     message.To.Add(Email);
     smtpClient.Send(message);
     message.Dispose();
     smtpClient.Dispose();
   }
});

Exception would be thrown in different threads and one thrown exception wouldn't cause breaking the other tasks. Of course you shouldn't forget to use using statement, which makes you sure that the memory will be disposed correctly. In your solution, when exception is thrown, even if it is caught message.Dispose() and smtp.Dispose() aren't executed.

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