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I ran the code below expecting flow to be locked on the 2nd time i lock a mutex. After running it twice i realize it can lock many times (assuming in the same thread) without stopping. How do i change this behavior?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

using System.Threading;

namespace Test
{
    class Program
    {
        static volatile Mutex mut1 = new Mutex();
        static volatile Mutex mut2 = new Mutex();
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            mut1.WaitOne(); Console.WriteLine("1W");
            mut2.WaitOne(); Console.WriteLine("2W");
            Thread oThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(fn2));
            oThread.Start();
            mut1.WaitOne(); Console.WriteLine("1W");
            Console.WriteLine("Second");
            mut1.ReleaseMutex(); Console.WriteLine("1R");
        }
        static void fn2()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("First");
            mut2.ReleaseMutex(); Console.WriteLine("2R");
            mut1.ReleaseMutex(); Console.WriteLine("1R");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Recursive mutexes only deadlock less often than non-recursive ones. Why would you prefer to have the non-recursive version? (I mean: if you write your program so that it is deadlock-free with the non-recursive version, it will still work with the recursive one) –  Pascal Cuoq Dec 13 '09 at 14:03
    
Non-answer: I remembered that critical sections were a slight variation on mutexes, but having checked, Windows' version of critical sections is recursive too. –  Pascal Cuoq Dec 13 '09 at 14:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For a start I am not sure you really understand mutexes, you can only release them in the context (i.e. thread) in which they were locked to begin with, so using them as some sort of guard points makes little sense.

It might make more sense to use semaphores in this case. But you still should work out what you are really trying to do :)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

using System.Threading;

namespace Test
{
    class Program
    {
        static Semaphore sem1 = new Semaphore(1, 1);
        static Semaphore sem2 = new Semaphore(1, 1);
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {           
            sem1.WaitOne(); Console.WriteLine("1W");
            sem2.WaitOne(); Console.WriteLine("2W");
            Thread oThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(fn2));
            oThread.Start();
            sem1.WaitOne(); Console.WriteLine("1W");
            Console.WriteLine("Second");
            sem1.Release(); Console.WriteLine("1R");
        }
        static void fn2()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("First");
            sem2.Release(); Console.WriteLine("2R");
            sem1.Release(); Console.WriteLine("1R");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow... Good catch... –  Pascal Cuoq Dec 13 '09 at 14:15

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