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Is there any way to initialize a ZipFile object by passing in the literal bytes of the zip file, instead of having it read a filename? I'm building a restful app that doesn't need to ever touch the disk; it just opens the file, does some work on it, re-zips it and sends it on.

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Just to be clear: what I'd like is to be able to open a zip file from a binary string. As in, I pass in a string containing binary data, and I receive a ZipFile object. The StringIO code I've seen so far deals with writing a ZipFile into a string, but it doesn't seem to provide a way to avoid writing a temporary file. –  limp_chimp Sep 23 '13 at 19:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In comments on the other answers, you say you want to do this:

open a binary string as if it were a zip file. Open it, read/write to files inside of it, and then close it

You just do the same thing as in the other answers, except you create a StringIO.StringIO (or cStringIO.StringIO or io.BytesIO) that's pre-filled with the binary string, and extract the string in the end. StringIO and friends take an optional initial string for their constructor, and have a getvalue method to extract the string when you're done. The documentation is very simple, and worth reading.

So, sticking as close to alecxe's answer as possible:

from zipfile import ZipFile
try:
    import cStringIO as StringIO
except ImportError:
    import StringIO

in_memory = StringIO.StringIO(original_zip_data)
zf = ZipFile(in_memory, "a")  

zf.writestr("file.txt", "some text contents")

zf.close()

new_zip_data = in_memory.getvalue()

However, note that ZipFile can't really write to a zip archive in-place, except for the special case of appending new files to it. This is just as true for in-memory zip archives as on-disk. You can often get away with overwriting a file in the archive by appending a new file with the same path, but that's usually a bad idea (especially if you're creating these things to be sent over the internet).

So, what you probably want to do is exactly the same as when you want to modify a file: create a separate output file, copy the things you need from the input file and write the new things as you go along. It's just that in this case, the input and output files are both ZipFile objects wrapping StringIO objects.

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Here's an example using (c)StringIO:

from zipfile import ZipFile
try:
    import cStringIO as StringIO
except ImportError:
    import StringIO

in_memory = StringIO.StringIO()   
zf = ZipFile(in_memory, "a")  

zf.writestr("file.txt", "some text contents")

zf.close()

Also see:

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Wouldn't BytesIO be better? Specifically because the code will then be portable between 2 and 3. –  Marcin Sep 23 '13 at 18:57

Sure, use (c)StringIO instead: http://docs.python.org/2/library/stringio.html Also, you should use BytesIO for Python 3. It does exist for 2.6 and 2.7 though.

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I think you mean BytesIO, but yes. –  Marcin Sep 23 '13 at 18:56
1  
@Marcin: In Python 2.x, StringIO.StringIO is fine. In 3.x, yes, you'd want to use io.BytesIO instead. –  abarnert Sep 23 '13 at 18:57
    
@abarnert Right. So using StringIO just introduces a portability issue for no reason. –  Marcin Sep 23 '13 at 19:00
2  
@Marcin: Sure, but using BytesIO also introduces a portability issue, since it doesn't exist in Python 2.5 (and, IIRC, is significantly slower than StringIO/cStringIO before 2.7.2 or so… but I could be remembering wrong, and it's less likely to matter). Put another way: would you argue that you should always use io.open in 2.x instead of open for ordinary files? –  abarnert Sep 23 '13 at 19:02
1  
@abarnert At this point, pretty much yes, unless pre-2.7 compatibility is known to be required. We're now 3 years into 2.7 being the current release series. There's very little reason for anyone to be using 2.6. (I don't consider having an out of date version installed by your distro to be a good reason). –  Marcin Sep 23 '13 at 19:12

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